Realising the untapped potential of indication documentation and indication-based prescribing

At present, there are a number of agreed-upon ‘right’ components to prescribing: the right patient, the right medication, the right dose, the right route, the right formulation, to be given at the right time. A conversation has been growing that suggests that another component should be added to this list: the ‘right’ indication1-4. This additional […]

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Lessons from remote antenatal care during the COVID-19 pandemic: how can we ensure equitable, safe, and patient-centred care?

Antenatal care is essential to supporting a healthy pregnancy. Traditionally, face-to-face consultations allowed for regular assessment and monitoring of the pregnancy, and represented an opportunity to support, reassure, and address concerns about pregnancy, labour, and birth. The onset of COVID-19 brought an abrupt shift to remote care as the primary means to continue providing antenatal […]

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Top 10 Article of 2021, Part 2

In this post, we’re offering summaries and comments on articles #1-5 from BMJ Quality & Safety’s Top 10 Articles of 2021. To check out the full list of our 21 finalists, click here. To read more about articles #6-10 in our Top 10 list, click here. The editors and the Editorial Board used data such […]

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Top 10 Articles of 2021, Part 1

In this post, we’re offering summaries and comments on articles from BMJ Quality & Safety’s Top 10 Articles of 2021. To check out the full list of our 21 finalists, click here. The editors and the Editorial Board used data such as citation rates and social media engagement in addition to their own judgement to […]

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Introducing the Top Articles of 2021

While choosing the top articles published in BMJ Quality and Safety is a challenge every year, 2021 saw a higher number of submissions than those seen prior to 2020. Nearly one in five submissions related to COVID-19. The editors and editorial board of the journal therefore had some difficult choices to make in selecting the […]

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The Electronic Health Record feedback journey of a thousand miles begins with . . .

At some point in most clinical careers, a patient recently seen by the clinician will be diagnosed by a subsequent clinician with something either unusual or unexpected. Ideally, the first clinician would learn of this new diagnosis quickly and have time and space for reflection, self-evaluation, and identification of anything they could have done differently. […]

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Rapid Improvements in Medication Safety with Bedside Learning Coordinators in the Nightingale Learning System

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the National Health Service (NHS) in England rapidly created the NHS Nightingale Hospital London (‘the Nightingale’) – a field hospital providing additional clinical capacity to support the NHS. This unique clinical environment presented both familiar and new, complex challenges in ensuring safe use of medicines. As part of the creation of […]

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The next frontier for patient safety? Bringing work back in

The study of patient safety has come a long way in the past twenty years,1 and yet commentators argue that it still has a long way to go.2,3 The prevailing model assumes that patient safety is a linear process, promoting concepts from manufacturing industries that identify errors after they have occurred and proposing solutions in […]

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Driving positive change: what can we learn from compliment letters?

Patient perceptions of care have been recognized as a key component of healthcare quality for over 30 years.1 Patient satisfaction began being reported at the hospital level in the US in 2007.2 However, despite recent institutional and governmental emphasis on satisfaction measures, studies have not shown consistent ways in which using these results can drive […]

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Virtual patient visits: bringing into view family member-staff relationships in times of COVID-19

Physical distancing measures during the COVID-19 pandemic have hindered communication between hospitalised patients and their family members. Sasangohar and colleagues[i] provide insight into use of an existing virtual intensive care unit (ICU) to facilitate online family visits amid Covid-19 visiting restrictions at a large, tertiary hospital in the United States. The paper raises some fascinating […]

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