The ACL injury journey – a guide for patients

This blog accompanies two infographics – published in British Journal of Sports Medicine – presenting the best available evidence, and designed with input from people who have experienced ACL injury. Both authors of the infographics are clinicians and researchers who work with many people of all ages and levels of sport after ACL injury. These infographics […]

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Football ACL injuries reloaded: how, where, and when #KnowledgeTranslation

Part of the BJSM’s #KnowledgeTranslation blog series Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) injuries are a serious concern for the football player. While there is an increasing trend for these injuries [1], the media dimension of ACL injuries is continuing to grow. 50% of these concerning injuries can be prevented [2], but conclusive data are lacking for […]

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Mind the Soft Tissue Gap – “Acute Knee Injuries”

By Dr Irfan Ahmed (T: @Irfan_sem) Over the last week, I have had time to reflect on the twitter feedback from my first blog. I must confess to feeling slightly overwhelmed, the “#softtissuegap” is trending, and has certainly outgrown its initial aim. One thread debated ‘if SEM should focus on acute care, secondary MSK clinics or even […]

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The ethical dilemma surrounding management of anterior cruciate ligament injuries

By Grayson Harwood @GraysonHarwood I recently had a patient (female, early 20’s) with a full-thickness ACL rupture with no other associated osteochondral, ligamentous, or meniscal injury – A ‘clean’ ACL rupture if you will. The injury occurred in a typical fashion – non-contact, change of direction, valgus/internal rotation mechanism while playing social-level football. At the […]

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Keep calm and carry on return to sport testing after an ACL injury: clinician-scientists weigh in on knee injury risk

By Jacob J. Capin, Lynn Snyder-Mackler, May Arna Risberg & Hege Grindem Imagine you are a sports medicine clinician responsible for an athlete with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Her surgery goes well, she completes her rehabilitation meticulously, passes your clinic’s return to sport (RTS) criteria, and starts to progress to full RTS. Now imagine another […]

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It is time to stop wasting time and money debating graft types and surgical approaches for ACL injuries: The secret probably lies in optimising rehabilitation

By Adam Culvenor, PT, PhD, @agculvenor; and Christian Barton, PT, PhD, @DrChrisBarton Last month, Professor Lars Engebretsen expressed concern on this blog regarding the potential return to popularity of synthetic grafts for cruciate ligament deficient knees in an attempt to optimise outcomes. There has been a great deal of research attempting to identify the optimal […]

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Synthetics ligaments in the knee: Deja vu or innovation ?

By Lars Engebretsen MD, PhD. Are you old enough to remember these orthopedic implants: GoreTex, Dacron, Polyester, Polypropylen, or carbon fibers? Let me remind you that these were not raincoats, mountaineering apparel or shoelaces— they were knee ligament substitutes! I am old enough to have tried these as substitutes for torn ACL or PCL, or augmentations […]

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Will training load modification reduce the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament ruptures in netball?

By Zoe Rippon Netball is the most common female team sport played in Australia and New Zealand. The elite professional netball league (ANZ championship) includes 10 teams across Australia and New Zealand. The high physical demands of the sport from sprinting, maximal jump landing (often with contact), change of direction and the rules only allowing […]

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Football injuries and their prevention with Swedish football injury warriors Martin & Markus

By Nirmala Perera (@Nim_Perera) with contributions from Martin Hägglund (@MHgglund) and Markus Waldén (@MarkusWalden) What are the most common/’costly’ football injuries? Hamstring Injuries Hamstring injuries are the most common injuries in football. The findings are consistent across studies. In fact, hamstring injury rates seem to be increasing in elite football.1 The long head of biceps femoris is most […]

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