Seeking Blog Content On This Year’s Theme: Access

Announcement by Cristina Hanganu-Bresch This year’s theme for Medical Humanities-BMJ is access to health care: how does accessibility as a facet of social justice impact how people manage and make sense of their health? Access to medical services can mean many things—from insurance coverage, to social services that make medical care possible, to outright discrimination for disadvantaged […]

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The Power of Equity: Interview with Oni Blackstock

Welcome back to the medical humanities podcast. I am Brandy Schillace, Editor in Chief, and today we are speaking with Dr. Oni Blackstock. In this episode, we discuss the powerful influence of Black women in medicine and in health justice. What will it take to change the course of healthcare and ensure equity for all? […]

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Black History Month: Featuring Dr. Charles DeWitt Watts (1917-2004)

In today’s feature, we honor the long career of Dr. Charles DeWitt Watts (1917-2004). Dr. Watts, the first African American to be certified by a surgical specialty board in North Carolina, spent a half-century advocating for civil rights and medical equity. In addition to playing a key role in founding Lincoln Community Health Center (which […]

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Black History Month Feature: Margaret Morgan Lawrence

Blog by Cristina Hanganu-Bresch Today we honor Margaret Morgan Lawrence (1914-2019), a psychiatrist and psychoanalyst, trailblazer pioneer in children’s community health. Lawrence had a storied career that was threatened at many turns by the intersection of racism and sexism. A graduate of Cornell in 1936 (when dorms were still segregated), she was denied entrance at […]

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Unexpected Gifts: Film review of “Looted,” by Rene van Pannevis

Looted, directed by Rene van Pannevis, UK, 2019, available on virtual cinema and on-demand. by Professor Robert Abrams, Weill Cornell, New York. Alert: the review contains plot spoilers!   The central story of Looted is a bitter father-son saga, a tragedy about parental failure and filial remorse.  The film also includes explicit depictions of terminal […]

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Review of “I Know This Much Is True” TV series (Derek Cianfrance, USA, 2020)

“Man Can Do What He Wills But He Cannot Will What He Wills” On the Freedom of the Will, Arthur Schopenauer, 1839. By Dr. Franco Ferrarini, gastroenterologist and film reviewer. This short HBO series centres on the life of two twin brothers, Thomas, and Dominick Birdsey (both played by Mark Ruffalo), the former affected by […]

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Book Review: Claire Hilton on “Staring Night” by Robert Abrams.

Staring Night:  Queen Victoria’s Late-life Depression by Robert C Abrams (New York: International Psychoanalytic Books, 2020. ISBN 978-1-949093-55-1) by Claire Hilton MD PhD FRCPsych, Historian in Residence, Royal College of Psychiatrists, 21 Prescot St, London E1 8BB, UK   historian@rcpsych.ac.uk In the last few months of her life, Queen Victoria was solemn, sad, and fearful, yet […]

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Reflecting on Loss and Grief

Review of ‘Loco’ (Rory Wilson, UK, 2020), ‘Skeletons’ (Will Peppercorn, UK, 2020), and ‘Early Grief Special’ (Jessica Chowdhury, UK, 2020), showing at the BFI Future Film Festival—Free Program Available online 18–21 February 2021, https://www.bfi.org.uk/future-film-festival Film Review by Khalid Ali, Film and Media Correspondent History taking from patients, and presenting stories of people’s illness in a […]

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Call for Papers: Access and Social Justice

The Covid-19 pandemic has stripped away comfortable illusions, has exposed how fragile our medical, governmental, and social health care systems, and has shed additional light on deeply problematic inequalities in the distribution and allocation of care. We mustn’t return to normal; normal was not good enough. For this reason, we are continuing this year in […]

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