Neglected No More: An Authentic Portrayal of People Affected by Leprosy

  Yomeddine (Abu Bakr Shawky, Egypt 2018), showing at the London Film Festival 18, 20, and 21 October, 2018. Review by Dr Khalid Ali, Film and Media Correspondent. In spite of its worldwide impact, leprosy remains on the World Health Organization (WHO) list of Neglected Tropical Diseases. In 2016, there were 216,108 new cases registered […]

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Troubled Minds in Troubled Times: The London Film Festival

The London Film Festival (10-21 October 2018) explores children and adolescents’ mental health  Review by Dr Khalid Ali, Film and Media Correspondent.   The 62nd British Film Institute (BFI) London Film Festival (LFF) returns in October with a selection of thought-provoking films from 75 countries. It is indeed a ‘globally diverse event’ as highlighted by its […]

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PTSD and Fatalité Intérieure: Pawel Pawlikowski’s ‘Cold War’

Cold War (Pawel Pawlikowski, Poland 2018). Reviewed by Prof. Robert Abrams, Weill Cornell College, New York. Cold War is a film set mostly in Poland in the Communist era from 1949 to the 1960s.  The majority of scenes are shot under a grim, steel-grey sky, befitting the spirit-crushing oppression that prevailed in that time and place. But the […]

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Using photography to enhance GP trainees’ reflective practice and professional development

Few would argue against the value of the ability to reflect upon one’s actions and one’s practice more broadly. According to photographic artist Rutherford, general practitioner Emer Forde, together with colleagues Jacqueline Priego-Hernandez, Aurelia Butcher and Clare Wedderburn, ‘reflection can foster professionalism, empathy and attitudinal changes’. In making this point, they highlight the Royal College […]

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Blind alleys and dead ends: researching innovation in late 20th century surgery

How do medical innovations evolve? In “Blind alleys and dead ends: researching innovation in late 20th century surgery,” Harriet Palfreman and Roger Kneebone examine the fortunes of a surgical innovation—the PCCL (percutaneous cholecystolithotomy) treatment of gallstones—in the late 20th century. In 1988, eight patients underwent the procedure, which required extracting the gallstones using an endoscope […]

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Lissa: A Story About Medical Promise, Friendship, and Revolution

Sherine Hamdy and Coleman Nye (writers), Sarula Bao and Caroline Brewer (art), Marc Parenteau (lettering), Lissa: A Story About Medical Promise, Friendship, and Revolution (2017), University of Toronto Press, 302 pp, £12.99. Reviewed by Dr Glyn Morgan Lissa is the first book in a new series from University of Toronto Press with the punningly pleasant […]

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Women, ‘madness’ and exercise

“Exercise is not politically neutral,” writes Jennifer Jane Hardes. That is, “within what has been declared a ‘risk society’ exercise ought to be examined critically as a new potential mode of self-regulation.” In what is both a concise and rich account “of knowledges about exercise and women’s mental health that emerged throughout the late 19th […]

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