CFP: Contribute to BMJ’s Medical Humanities Journal!

I’m Brandy Schillace, Editor in Chief of BMJ’s Medical Humanities Journal, an official journal of the Institute of Medical Ethics. We’ve spent the last four years working toward social justice, accessibility, global outreach, and inclusivity. We’ve welcomed research and writing from the LGBTQ and disability community, and included podcasts with activists and others dedicated to […]

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Seeking Blog Content On This Year’s Theme: Access

Announcement by Cristina Hanganu-Bresch This year’s theme for Medical Humanities-BMJ is access to health care: how does accessibility as a facet of social justice impact how people manage and make sense of their health? Access to medical services can mean many things—from insurance coverage, to social services that make medical care possible, to outright discrimination for disadvantaged […]

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A New Take on the Canonic Book The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down

Book Review by Luxin Yin More than two decades after its publication in 1997, Anne Fadiman’s The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down is frequently required reading in medical schools and used to train future practitioners on the importance of cross-cultural communication. The book concerns the difficulties faced by a young Hmong epileptic, Lia […]

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The Transition from Abortion to Miscarriage to Describe Early Pregnancy Loss in British Medical Journals: A Prescribed or Natural Lexical Change?

Article Summary by Beth Malory “The transition from abortion to miscarriage to describe early pregnancy loss in British medical journals: A prescribed or natural lexical change?”, published in Medical Humanities in March 2022, investigates the origins of the shift from use of the word ‘abortion’ to ‘miscarriage’ in medical British English. Using the statistical technique Change Point Analysis, this […]

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December 2022 Issue: Health Policy and Emotion

Health, policy and emotion Agnes Arnold-Forster, Michael Brown, Alison Moulds Women’s voices, emotion and empathy: engaging different publics with ‘everyday’ health histories Tracey Loughran, Kate Mahoney, Daisy Payling Pulling our lens backwards to move forward: an integrated approach to physician distress Sydney Amelia McQueen, Melanie Hammond Mobilio, Carol-anne Moulton Cicely Saunders, ‘Total Pain’ and emotional […]

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Immersive and Interactive: Accessibility Theatre and LivingBodiesObjects

Podcast with Amelia DeFalco and Steve Byrne about Interplay Theater The Wellcome-funded project LivingBodiesObjects: Technologies and the Spaces of Health is currently partnering with Interplay National Sensory Theatre, an innovative theatre company that employs sensory engagement in ways that highlight the audience’s embodiment as much as the performers’. LBO and Interplay are exploring techniques and […]

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Biopower Under a State of Exception: Stories of Dying and Grieving Alone During COVID-19 Emergency Measures

Article Summary by J. Cristian Rangel For Helen During the first waves of COVID-19, governments across the world enforced lockdown policies with the intention of protecting entire populations from infection and death. This was done under a climate of scientific and medical uncertainty about the infectivity and lethality of the novel coronavirus. Because these policies […]

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‘The Time is Out of Joint’: Temporality, COVID-19 and Graphic Medicine

Article Summary by Sathyaraj Venkatesan and Ishani Anwesha Joshi The article theorizes the human experiences of time during the lockdown and COVID-19 pandemic through selected comics. This research discusses how comics can be used to communicate the passage of time and argues that the events of the pandemic have shifted our temporal experience from clock […]

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Collecting Affect: Emotion and Empathy in World War II Photographs and Drawings of Plastic Surgery

Article Summary by Christine Slobogin Diana “Dickie” Orpen (1911-1987) and Percy Hennell (1911-1987) were both surgical artists who represented Second World War patients’ wounds and their reconstructive processes within English plastic surgery wards. The major difference between these two actors is that Orpen made drawings and Hennell took photographs. This article looks at the work […]

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In Critique of Anthropocentrism: A More-than-Human Ethical Framework for Antimicrobial Resistance

Article Summary by Jose A. Cañada, Salla Sariola and Andrea Butcher   Antibiotics are currently the main method for controlling bacterial infections. However, their extensive use has led bacteria to develop resistance towards them. This means that the same amount of antibiotic is less and less effective in treating infections. This process is known as […]

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Fatherlessness, Sperm Donors and ‘So What?’ Parentage: Arguing Against the Immorality of Donor Conception Through ‘World Literature’

Article Summary by Grace Halden Is biology and knowing biological ancestral information essential to the construction of identity? Bioethicist James David Velleman believes this is the case and argues that donor gamete conception is immoral because a portion of genetic heritage will be unknown. Velleman is critical of sperm donation and the absence of a […]

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