Book Review: Phenomenology of Illness

Phenomenology of Illness by Havi Carel, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016 Reviewed by James Rakoczi Havi Carel’s Phenomenology of Illness is a rich and tightly-structured book with two principle aims. First, ‘to provide a comprehensive and coherent phenomenology of illness’ (38). Second, to travel in the ‘opposite direction’ and give an account of ‘what illness […]

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Humanitarian Evidence Week (HEW), 19th-25th November 2018

Humanitarian Evidence Week (HEW) is a week of both virtual and online events co-ordinated by the UK charity, Evidence Aid, which since 2004 has championed evidence-based approaches to humanitarian action. Additional support for HEW 2018 is provided by the Centre for Evidence-based Medicine (CEBM) at the University of Oxford. This annual event takes place in […]

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Pilgrims’ Progress: Need for a Humanitarian Mass-Gathering Policy

In this blog, Kesavan Rajasekharan Nayar and his colleagues discuss the need for an international, multi-dimensional mass-gathering policy, using the case study of a mass-gathering phenomenon for religious purposes in Kerala, India which draws about 45 million people annually. Mass-gathering in such huge numbers poses considerable challenges in terms of communicable and non-communicable disease surveillance, […]

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CFP: Metaphoric Stammers and Embodied Speakers

Metaphoric Stammers and Embodied Speakers: Expanding the Borders of Dysfluency Studies, Humanities Institute, University College Dublin, 12 October, 2018. Extended deadline for submissions: 30 July 2018. Keynote speaker: Chris Eagle, Emory University, Centre for the Study of Human Health (Dysfluencies: On Speech Disorders in Modern Literature, 2014; Talking Normal: Literature, Speech Disorders, and Disability, ed. […]

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At a Closer Look Nobody is Normal

Like Crazy, (Paolo Virzi, Italy, 2016) Reviewed by Franco Ferrarini, Gastroenterologist and Film Reviewer Beatrice (Valeria Bruni Tedeschi) and Donatella (Micaela Ramazzotti) live in a Mental Care Health Home. The former is an upper class mythomaniac, a compulsive liar with fantastical stories, whilst the latter comes from a lower socio-economic class and suffers from severe […]

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