Humanitarian Evidence Week, Nov 20

Today’s promoted HEW posts feature work on focusing relief efforts around need, and for assessment and research in the face of humanitarian crises. Learn more about Evidence Aid and Humanitarian Aid Week here. Blog: “Because rolling dice, asking for divine intervention and taking wild stabs at the problem don’t work”: The use of evidence in […]

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Humanitarian Evidence Week, Nov 19

We continue our promotion of Humanitarian Evidence Week with a selection of blog texts, and a reminder about the webinar. Blog: Long term impact of Shelter Response, Written by Charles Parrack, CENDEP, Oxford Brookes University. Blog: Clinical evidence from humanitarian settings: The case report and its importance Written by Marta Balinska, MSF Switzerland, Joanna Ventikos, […]

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Humanitarian Evidence Week! Nov 19-25

We at MEDICAL HUMANITIES welcome our readers to take part in Humanitarian Evidence Week 2018. What is Humanitarian Evidence Aid? Evidence Aid was established as a charity in 2015. When disaster strikes, from fire to epidemics to famine, the difficulty isn’t just providing aid, it’s knowing how to provide aid effectively. It does no good […]

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Supple Bodies, Healthy Minds: Yoga, Psychedelics and American Mental Health

In “Supple Bodies, Healthy Minds: Yoga, Psychedelics and American Mental Health,” Lucas Richert and Matthew DeCloedt chart the entanglement of yoga and psychedelics in America during the first three quarters of the twentieth century, paying special attention to the countercultural 1960s, when the two became widely popular amongst a generation of primarily middle class, white […]

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Paradigm Shift? Purity, Progress and the Origins of First-Episode Psychosis

In “Paradigm Shift? Purity, Progress and the Origins of First-Episode Psychosis,” Suze G. Berkhout examines images, concepts and metaphors in the medical literature on early intervention into first-episode psychosis (FEP) to understand how its embeds notions of purity and progress, and how the origins of the category is coeval with the development of new anti-psychotic […]

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Evidence and Speculation: Reimagining Approaches to Architecture and Research within the Paediatric Hospital

Evidence-based design (EBD), a method of design that is derived from evidence-based medicine, might at first seem a far-cry from the concerns of speculative design, but in their article “Evidence and Speculation: Reimagining Approaches to Architecture and Research within the Paediatric Hospital,” Rebecca McLaughlan and Alan Pert show that speculative design functions in ways that […]

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Sing Your Heart Out: Community Singing as Part of Mental Health Recovery

Tom Shakespeare and Alice Whieldon report on a mixed-methods study of the Norfolk-based (UK) community-run “Sing Your Heart Out” (SYHO) project in their article, “Sing Your Heart Out: Community Singing as Part of Mental Health Recovery.” Through a combination of semi-structured interviews and focus groups with project leaders and participants, along with participant observation, Shakespeare […]

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Using photography to enhance GP trainees’ reflective practice and professional development

Few would argue against the value of the ability to reflect upon one’s actions and one’s practice more broadly. According to photographic artist Rutherford, general practitioner Emer Forde, together with colleagues Jacqueline Priego-Hernandez, Aurelia Butcher and Clare Wedderburn, ‘reflection can foster professionalism, empathy and attitudinal changes’. In making this point, they highlight the Royal College […]

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Blind alleys and dead ends: researching innovation in late 20th century surgery

How do medical innovations evolve? In “Blind alleys and dead ends: researching innovation in late 20th century surgery,” Harriet Palfreman and Roger Kneebone examine the fortunes of a surgical innovation—the PCCL (percutaneous cholecystolithotomy) treatment of gallstones—in the late 20th century. In 1988, eight patients underwent the procedure, which required extracting the gallstones using an endoscope […]

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Women, ‘madness’ and exercise

“Exercise is not politically neutral,” writes Jennifer Jane Hardes. That is, “within what has been declared a ‘risk society’ exercise ought to be examined critically as a new potential mode of self-regulation.” In what is both a concise and rich account “of knowledges about exercise and women’s mental health that emerged throughout the late 19th […]

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