Genetics, Molar Pregnancies, and Medieval Ideas of Monstrous Births: The Lump of Flesh in The King of Tars

by Natalie Goodison What’s fascinating about this paper is that it’s a collaboration between geneticists and medievalists—and this very rich perspective led me to rethink what the Middle Ages considered fact/fictitious. It begins with a fictional story, within which a woman gives birth to a lump of flesh. When I first read about this lump, […]

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The Poetry of Addiction: Review of ‘Wherever you are-Ovunque Proteggemi’, Directed by Bonifacio Angius, Italy 2018

Showing in ‘Cinema made in Italy 2019’ London Saturday 2nd March, https://www.british-italian.org/cinema-made-in-italy-2019/ Written by Professor Robert Abrams, Weill Cornell Medicine ‘Wherever You Are’ is a new Italian film that portrays addiction along with its usual weight of bleak antecedents and consequences, including dependency, conflict, depression and the collateral suffering of family members. But this alternately […]

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Material Medicine: Objects and Bodies– AMH Conference 2019

We are pleased to announce the CFP for the Association of Medical Humanities (UK) 2019 conference. CFP below; Read more here. Call for Papers We kindly encourage you to submit a proposal for presentation addressing one or more of the below-mentioned topics for the AMH Material Objects Conference 2019. The conference reflects on medical humanities practices […]

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Smoking and lung cancer paradox in Kerala: An Epidemiological Epiphany

Smoking and lung cancer paradox in Kerala: An Epidemiological Epiphany In this blog post Professors Kesavan Rajasekharan Nayar and Raghu Ram K. Nair highlight the emerging smoking-lung cancer paradox in Kerala and posit some tentative explanations. The BMJ played a historical role in establishing the relationship between smoking and lung cancer way back in the […]

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“Life Can Only Be Understood Backwards; But It Must Be Lived Forwards”: Review of Mystic River

Review of Mystic River, USA 2003, directed by Clint Eastwood. Review by Franco Ferrarini, gastroenterologist and film reviewer. Review contains plot spoilers. Based on the eponymous 2001 novel by Dennis Lehane, “Mystic River” is one of the darkest and probably best of Clint Eastwood movies. The story might be well known to those who read […]

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The Immigrants’ Case of Shakespeare: A Discussion About Borders and Health Effects of Separation

In the only surviving script to contain his handwriting, William Shakespeare composed an extraordinary speech for the The Book of Sir Thomas More in which More defends immigrants against an angry mob. Over 400 years later, the United States federal government was shut down for weeks over the issue of whether to construct a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border. In this podcast, public […]

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The Human Body in the Age of Catastrophe: Brittleness, Integration, Science and the Great War

Stefanous Geroulanos and Todd Meyers (writers). The Human Body in the Age of Catastrophe: Brittleness, Integration, Science and the Great War (2018), University of Chicago Press, 432 pp, £26.50. by Linda Roland Danil In this book, Geroulanos and Meyers mainly explore the emergence of a new approach towards corporeal integration in physiology during and after […]

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The 2nd The Doctor as a Humanist Symposium

Jonathan McFarland (Sechenov University) and Irina Markovina (Sechenov University). In October 2017 the 1st The Doctor as a Humanist symposium took place in Palma de Mallorca, Spain. At the symposium we posed the questions, “Can the Humanities transform 21st Century Medicine?” The end of the first symposium in Spain was closed with the words, “Thanks […]

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Biomedicine and the Humanities: Growing Pains

In this article for December’s Special Issue, Hume, Mulemi, and Sadok take a look at the unique challenges facing humanities researchers in clinical and community health settings in Kenya, Tanzania and South Africa. Their work considers these experiences within the broader context—but our broader context of disciplinary ’ethnocentrism’ that hampers the development of knowledge in […]

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