In Shock

Rana Awdish, In Shock: My Journey from Death to Recovery and the Redemptive Power of Hope (2018), New York: Bantam Press, 272 pp, £14.99. Reviewed by Róisín King, Trinity College Dublin Aptly stated by Ed Pellegrino, ‘medicine is the most humane of the sciences, the most scientific of the humanities’. This implies an essential balance […]

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‘The Gut-Brain Axis’: Cultural and Historical Perspectives

Report by Dr Manon Mathias, University of Glasgow This two-day workshop held at the University of Glasgow, 4–5 May 2018, brought together 35 delegates from Australia, Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Norway, the UK, and the USA. Participants represented a wide range of institutions, career levels, and disciplines. The aim of the event was to consider the […]

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Trippy Yoga: A Short History of Psychedelics and Flexible Minds and Bodies in the 1960s

Today’s blog post comes from Dr Lucas Richert, who is a Lecturer in the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare, University of Strathclyde and Matthew DeCloedt, a PhD student in Constitutional Law at CEU.   Americans were receptive to new thinking and practices in the 1960s. People mobilized. A human rights movement […]

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“A Kind of Agonie in my Thoughts”: Writing Puritan and Non-Conformist Women’s Pain in 17th-Century England

In this soundbite, Alison Searle tells us about her article, published in our current issue, “Pain and its Paradoxes”. Searle’s article, “‘A Kind of Agonie in my Thoughts’: Writing Puritan and Non-Conformist Women’s Pain in 17th-Century England”, explores the ways in which pain transgresses the borders between the corporeal, the mental, and the spiritual, borders […]

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Coping with Chronic Pain, Illness and Incarceration

In his article for our June special issue, ‘Pain and its Paradoxes’, Drew Leder looks at the intersections between those suffering chronic pain and those experiencing long-term incarceration in his article, ‘Coping with Chronic Pain, Illness and Incarceration: What Patients and Prisoners Have to Teach Each Other (and All of Us).’ Leder takes a phenomenological […]

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Optimal Relief for Pain at the End of Life: A Caregiver’s Tale

In his article for our June special issue, “Pain and its Paradoxes”, David B. Morris offers a heartfelt account of his experience occupying a “third-person position” as an end-of-life caregiver to his late wife, Ruth C. Morris, and a reflection on the role of palliative pain-relief for the dying. Remarking on how biomedicine is often […]

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Pain as Performance: Re-Virginisation in Turkey

In an article for our June special issue “Pain and its Paradoxes”, “Pain as Performance: Re-Virginisation in Turkey,” Hande Güzel turns to an analysis of acute pain related to re-virginisation, a surgical process of hymenoplasty that women in Turkey undertake to satisfy social expectations regarding virginity upon marriage. These expectations lead to the performance of what […]

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