Mobile app to tackle doping in sport: the ASADA Clean Sport

By Nash Anderson (@sportmednews)1, Nat Sharp 1, Balraj Ougra 2

1Enhance Healthcare, Mitchell, ACT, Australia
2Back Space Chiro, Sydney, NSW, Australia

 

APP REVIEW

 NAME OF THE MOBILE APPLICATION

ASADA

PLATFORM

Android: 4.0.3 and up. Version 1.1.329 tested.

iOS: Requires iOS 9.0 or later. Compatible with iPhone, iPad and iPod touch.

COST

Free

ABOUT THE APP

If an athlete is found guilty of a doping infringement, they can face a ban of up to 4 years. This eliminates them from competing, coaching or working at any event sanctioned by a National Federation and could also mean they are unable to train with their team. This ban also extends to support staff so it is important that all on board are aware of WADA’s anti-doping legislation.

To combat this, ASADA (The Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority) has created “ASADA Clean Sport” a free app to help educate athletes, support staff and the public about the supplements they may be taking. This aims to both eliminate sports doping and to protect Australia’s sporting integrity.

APP FEATURES

  • A database of supplements sold in Australia to help you find a low risk product. There are no supplements that are directly endorsed by ASADA, but “ASADA Clean Sport” gives a complete list of every supplement sold on Australian shelves, screened by independent laboratories for prohibited substances. These substances have been batch-tested, so while ASADA cannot guarantee that they are 100% free from prohibited substances, the information about the supplement significantly lowers the athletes chances of a positive test. For supplements that aren’t listed on the app, a quick quiz can be done to do a basic screen on the risks posed and suitability of the supplement for an athlete.
  • A check for Australian medication to see whether it is permitted in sport or not.
  • A portal for anonymously reporting doping
  • A short form to give feedback to ASADA on a testing mission, education session or any other part of ASADA’s work
  • Links to free ASADA education
  • Important information on Therapeutic Use Exemptions (TUEs), the testing process, anti-doping rules
Figure 1 Screenshot of ASADA Mobile app

 

USE IN CLINICAL PRACTICE

The implications of testing positive can be devastating. This is an incredibly useful app for our athletes, coaches, support staff and practitioners to check supplements and medications.

PROS  

  • A free app that can save your career.
  • A reliable resource to check any medication sold in Australia to see if it is prohibited in sport or not.
  • World first supplement tool to assist you in determining whether the use of a supplement is worth the risk.
  • Read short, snappy information on TUEs, travelling overseas and your rights being tested as well as information on TUEs, the testing process, the anti doping rules, whereabouts and more
Figure 2 Screenshot of ASADA Mobile app

 

CONS

  • The app lists only supplements and medications which are sold in Australia. This can, however, serve as an example that could be adapted for local anti-doping organisations globally.
  • Supplement checking can give the illusion that the athlete will be safe. As the supplements are batch-tested, there can be no guarantee that each singular product is free from prohibited substances. This is forewarned at the start of the app.
  • For many of the app features users are diverted to the ASADA website via a hyperlink rather than providing the information in-app.This app mostly provides links to web pages rather than, the medication checking and doping reporting features are not actually in the app. There is scope for much improvement.
  • Supplement checking in the app is quite slow and as mentioned previously, still has no guarantee that it is free from prohibited substances.
Figure 3 Screenshot of ASADA Mobile app disclaimer

 

Overall hats off to ASADA for thinking of innovative and exciting ways to make antidoping regulations more engaging. This app as well as their Anti-doping VR experience on their website show a great commitment to educating their audience.

Correspondence to

Nash Anderson: @sportmednews
Enhance Healthcare, 10/141 Flemington Rd, Mitchell, 2911, ACT, Australia
Email: nash.anderson@gmail.com

 

For more information visit:

https://elearning.asada.gov.au/
Apple App Store| Google Play Store
For the ASADA VR Experience visit:
https://dcs.awe.io/introduction-m

Recommended Follow Up Anti-Doping Resources

WADA Prohibited list
https://www.wada-ama.org/en/resources/science-medicine/prohibited-list-documents
Check your substances – Globaldro
http://www.globaldro.com/AU/search
ASADA
https://www.asada.gov.au

 

Recommended follow up BJSM Resources

Gaehwiler, R. (2017).“Anti-doping and the physician’s role: how do we overcome the challenges in elite sport?” BJSM Blogs. FREELink here – http://blogs.bmj.com/bjsm/2017/02/03/anti-doping-physicians-role-overcome-challenges-elite-sport/

Stuart, M. Schneider, C.; Steinbach, K. (2016). “Meldonium use by athletes at the Baku 2015 European Games. Adding data to Ms Maria Sharapova’s failed drug test case” BJSM Blogs. FREELink here – http://blogs.bmj.com/bjsm/2016/03/08/meldonium-use-by-athletes-at-the-baku-2015-european-games-adding-data-to-ms-maria-sharapovas-failed-drug-test-case/

HP Dijkstra, HP; Van Dyk, N; Schumacher, YO (2015). “Can I tell you something? I’m doping…” BJSM Blogs. FREELink here – http://blogs.bmj.com/bjsm/2015/11/16/can-i-tell-you-something-im-doping/

“The World Anti-Doping Agency, and blood passports, with Alan Vernec” (2013).  BJSM podcasts.FREELink here – https://soundcloud.com/bmjpodcasts/the-world-anti-doping-agency

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