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David Payne

Readers’ editor: Where has all the research news gone?

3 Sep, 13 | by BMJ Group

David Payne In March 2005 Ali Tonks wrote her first weekly Short Cuts column, a summary of nine papers published in the world’s other main general medical journals. The following year we published the first of Richard Lehman’s weekly journal review blogs. more…

Readers’ editor: Homophobia and the BMJ

21 Aug, 13 | by BMJ Group

David Payne In December 2012 Doug Kamerow asked in his regular BMJ column if gay marriage improves health.

Eight months later the article attracted its first response. Gregory Gardner, a GP in the West Midlands, wanted to know why Kamerow had not mentioned the impact of same sex marriage on the health and wellbeing of children. Dr Gardner’s response cited the 2012 findings from the New Family Structures Study in the Elsevier journal Social Science Research by Mark Regnerus, associate professor of sociology at the University of Austin, Texas. more…

Readers’ editor: The Liverpool Care Pathway—anyone care outside the UK?

31 Jul, 13 | by BMJ Group

David Payne Columnist Charles Moore asked in The Spectator magazine last week if the Liverpool Care Pathway might have inspired more confidence if it had been called, say, the Oxford Care Pathway.

Was Moore referring to Oxford as an ancient seat of learning and innovation, or lazily perpetuating the myth that Liverpool is synonomous with riots, poverty, and crime and therefore incapable of either developing or inspiring confidence in a tool to deliver end of life care? (It was the city’s Marie Curie Hospice that collaborated on an end of life care pathway for use in hospitals in the late 1990s, BMJ clinical fellow Krishna Chinthapalli reminds us in his blog). more…

Readers’ editor: Authors “ignoring” readers

18 Jul, 13 | by BMJ Group

David Payne Joginder Anand, a longstanding reader of the BMJ, wants to know how we can encourage authors to respond. In a recent email he asks: “Should the BMJ not make it mandatory for the leading authors of all articles to respond to criticisms or requests for clarifications?

My question back to him is how? What would be the penalty?

Dr Anand suggests banning further publication in the journal.

Would that work? I don’t think so. Many of our authors are busy clinicians or researchers. Often they intend to respond, but finding the time to do so is a challenge. We are delighted when they do, but acknowledge it isn’t always feasible. more…

Readers’ editor: Influence beyond the impact factor

2 Jul, 13 | by BMJ Group

David PayneThe BMJ’s impact and influence should be measured by more than just established metrics such as impact factor.

But the new figures, released two weeks ago, are very welcome. The journal’s impact factor rose more than 20% to 17.215. My first thought on discovering this was that a strategic aim to increase the impact of the BMJ’s scholarly content is starting to pay off.

The new figure makes the BMJ the most highly cited open access general medical journal in the world, now higher than PLoS Medicine and puts it in the top four general medical journals, above the Annals of Internal Medicine. This is due in part to a conscious drive to publish research that will be highly cited as well as widely read by clinicians around the world.

But authors also value media coverage alongside measures such as impact factor, and articles in the BMJ get namechecked regularly in UK and international newspapers, magazines, blogs, and broadcast channels. This blog aims to illustrate the ripple effect caused by media coverage and the debate it can engender, both in the BMJ and beyond. more…

Readers’ editor: International research

27 Jun, 13 | by BMJ Group

David Payne The BMJ wants its research papers to help doctors make better decisions, which is why they are open access and free to view.

But to deliver on the pledge our research also needs to be scientifically valid, clinically relevant, widely read and cited, and appeal to international readers. Each year we get more than 3000 submissions, but we usually only accept 2 to 5%.

Sara Schroter has run the BMJ’s in-house research programme since 2001. Her latest report is an audit of papers submitted and published between 2004 and 2012. It tracks a range of indicators. These help us to see if our published research is being accessed on bmj.com and cited, and what proportion is getting picked up by secondary sources like Evidence Updates, Journal Watch, Evidence Based Medicine Journal, etc. more…

Readers’ editor: Abbreviations and patient safety

7 Jun, 13 | by BMJ Group

David Payne In January this year a hospital pharmacist contacted us after a colleague had questioned a prescription for amlodipine 10 mg four times a day for migraine.  She contacted the prescriber, who said he had got the dose from this clinical review  about pharmacological prevention of migraine published in The BMJ. more…

Readers’ editor: An evening with Itchy Sneezy Wheezy

29 May, 13 | by BMJ Group

David Payne Last week’s print BMJ included a 14 page supplement about BMJ Awards, held a week earlier in London. If you didn’t see it, here’s a link. The BMJ Awards website lists all the winners, along with pictures from the night.

The BMJ Awards are now five years old. The event goes from strength to strength. Next year we are launching BMJ Awards India in Mumbai.

I’ve attended all of the UK events and inevitably compare the BMJ event with the dozens of others I’ve been to over the last 20 years for healthcare professionals, digital developments, and journalism. more…

Readers’ editor: Free pens and memory sticks

23 May, 13 | by BMJ Group

David Payne I spent yesterday at St George’s Hospital in Tooting, south London, talking to readers of the BMJ. The medical school library had organised an open day and a sales colleague had organised a BMJ stand, so I joined him to discuss our plans for the BMJ website with both qualified doctors and medical students. more…

Readers’ editor: BMJ cruise, anyone?

15 May, 13 | by BMJ Group

David Payne Readers of the Radio Times can visit locations used in the filming of Sir David Attenborough’s Africa on a tailor made tour offered by the 90 year old UK listings magazine. The Africa trip is one of dozens of destinations listed on RT Travel page and the latest example of how publishers are increasingly thinking like retailers to offer their readers everything from holidays to horticulture. more…

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