Resurrectionism at Easter

There’s a provocative piece in a recent New Scientist about what happens to unclaimed bodies after death – about, specifically, the practice of coopting them for research purposes. Gareth Jones, who wrote it, points out that the practice has been going on for centuries – but that a consequence of the way it’s done is that it tends […]

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How Magic can help Teach Students about Medical Ethics

Guest post by Daniel Sokol, KCL For some time, I have been interested in the relationship between magic and medical ethics.  Five years ago, I gave a talk in Prague on how to use magic in medical ethics education.  More recently, I held a workshop on Magic for Anaesthetists, which touched on ethical issues in […]

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Call for Participants: Concepts of Mental Health

British Postgraduate Philosophy Association Masterclass 2013 April 12th-13th, University College London This year’s BPPA masterclass will be on concepts of mental health, and applications are invited from graduate researchers within the field of philosophy and mental health. A masterclass involves a mixture of seminars, group workshops, presentations by students and experts and critical discussion.  The […]

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Modesty, Conscience, and What it Takes to be a Doctor (with a bit of Comedy)

Two apparently unrelated new and new-ish papers in the JME have caught my eye over the last few days.  One of them is this one: Salilah Saidun’s “Photographing Human Subjects in Biomedical Disciplines: An Islamic Perspective”.  We’ll come to the other in a little while. There’s a couple of puzzling things about the paper.  One is […]

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Jon Cogburn’s Plea to Grad Students (and Others)

[IB: I’m taking the liberty of copying in its entirety Jon Cogburn’s post on NewAPPS about submitting papers to journals, because it’s worth reading.  He directs it to graduate students – but I think that the same point applies to anyone, especially if they’re new to the field in which they’re writing.  Since a lot […]

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Is Bioethics Really a Bully? Really?

On his blog in The Independent, John Rentoul has a long-running feature called “Questions to which the Answer is No“.  In it, he examines the kind of screaming rhetorical-question headline much beloved of certain middle-market tabloids: “Is this photographic evidence of Nessie?”, “Does coffee cure cancer?”, “Does coffee cause cancer?”, “Does MMR bring down house prices?“* and […]

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Philosophy, Bioethics and Otherworldliness

Hmmmm. So Brian L picked up on Catarina’s post that picked up on Brian E’s post that picked up on the ever-simmering stuff about male circumcision – and the American Academy of Pediatrics’ latest policy position in particular – with the comment “Philosophers are a bit unworldly, but this is still quite something”.  I take the […]

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