Too much or too little? A summary of the forum on financial incentives to participants in health and breastfeeding research

By Rasita Vinay and Annina Bauer. On 13th April 2022, the third webinar for the Forum of Global Health Ethics webinar series took place, focusing on the issue of offering financial incentives to participants in health and breastfeeding research. Offering financial incentives to research participants is a common practice in health research; however, its use […]

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How much should you trust research ethicists’ warnings about public distrust?

By Nir Eyal In many places around the world, declining levels of public trust in health officials, medical advice, and medical products are causing damages to personal and public health. For example, distrust is a major contributor to the low uptake of COVID-19 vaccination in many countries. Understandably, bioethicists seek to heed the potential of […]

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Multifetal pregnancy reduction – why would you do it?

By Gregory K Pike. Multifetal Pregnancy Reduction (MFPR) was initially a response to the high incidence of multiples in Assisted Reproductive Technology. It has even been called “an integral fail-safe of infertility practice”. Its goal was, and mostly still is, to improve outcomes by terminating some fetuses in a multiple pregnancy, on the grounds that […]

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When context calls: EFBRI – An Evolving Ethical Framework Informing Breastfeeding Research and Interventions

By Michaela Hefti and Rasita Vinay. Currently, there are no specific ethics guidelines informing biomedical research in breastfeeding and lactation – despite the potentially vulnerable populations involved. On 10 March 2022, EFBRI – An Evolving Ethical Framework Informing Breastfeeding Research and Interventions, was introduced via a LactaWebinar to address this gap and discuss the practical […]

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Don’t stop now: Continuing global engagement on pandemic policy

By Nancy S. Jecker, Caesar A. Atuire With rare exceptions, many people around the world have gleefully shed masks and with them, any lingering concerns about catching the novel coronavirus. Maskless and nonchalant, we are boarding planes, shopping, showing up at parties, enjoying entertainment, and going to in-person classes. Proof of vaccination has also fallen […]

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Seeing surgeons to safety

By Edwin Jesudason. Surgeons around the world are videoing their operations to present innovations to their peers at academic meetings. In my paper, I argue that they and their hospitals have an ethical duty to protect patients, which should require the routine videoing of surgery as long as the patient consents. This would provide something […]

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Including Black, Indigenous and Latinx communities as partners in the planning and implementation of Long COVID-19 responses: recommendations for enhancing health equity

By Michelle Medeiros, Hillary Edwards, Claudia Baquet. COVID-19 data, where are the holes and what does this mean for Long COVID? As the SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic progresses, the impact of persistent, long-term respiratory, functional, and psychological comorbidities becomes more evident in the general population, and particularly within Black, Indigenous and Latinx communities. Black, Indigenous, and […]

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Respect for autonomy in medical ethics: it’s more complicated than you think

By Xavier Symons and Susan Pennings. Respect for patient autonomy is perhaps the pre-eminent principle in contemporary bioethics. What else, after all, is more important than respecting the considered preferences of patients and research participants in medicine?  Tom Beauchamp once wrote that “[the] moral value of respect for autonomy precedes and is not the product […]

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