Public Reason and Physicians’ Duty to Refrain from Religious Discourse

By Jake Greenblum and Ryan Hubbard We recently offered a reply to criticisms of our view that physicians should refrain from deliberating with their patients on religious grounds when helping them make medical decisions.  Part of what prompted our research into this topic is recent work discussing appropriate ways of communicating with religious patients who […]

Read More…

Nanny on the bus: The ethics of banning food on public transport

By David Shaw The last report of the outgoing UK Chief Medical Officer, Dr Sally Davies, is entitled “Time to Solve Childhood Obesity”. It makes many sensible public health recommendations, including increases in the levy on sweet drinks and taxation on snacks, and reducing portion sizes and marketing aimed at children. But a different recommendation […]

Read More…

Take care when testing manufactured organs on the deceased

By Laura Kimberly, Brendan Parent Every article about the organ transplant crisis starts something like this: In the United States in 2018, over 116,000 individuals were on the waiting list for an organ transplant. Yet of those on the waiting list, only 36,000 (31%) received a much-needed transplant to treat their end-stage organ failure, and […]

Read More…

Should pregnant women pay for non-invasive prenatal testing?

By Eline M. Bunnik & Adriana Kater-Kuipers. Today, pregnant women can use non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) in the first trimester of their pregnancy to screen for chromosomal abnormalities. NIPT requires only a blood draw, is more reliable than previous screening modalities, and leads to fewer false positive results, thus saving women from unnecessary invasive follow-up […]

Read More…

The first prosecution of a Dutch doctor since the Euthanasia Act of 2002: what does the verdict mean?

By Eva C.A. Asscher and Suzanne van de Vathorst. On September 11th 2019, a verdict was reached in the first prosecution of a doctor for carrying out euthanasia in The Netherlands since the 2002 Termination of Life on Request and Assisted Suicide (Review Procedures) Act was passed. The case concerned a patient with severe dementia […]

Read More…

What does the public think should happen when parents and doctors disagree about life support for a child?

By Claudia Brick and Dominic Wilkinson. The case of Tafida Raqeeb, currently being heard in the High Court, is the latest high profile legal battle between physicians and parents about life sustaining treatment for a seriously ill child. Since suffering a severe stroke in February, five-year old Tafida has been in intensive care at the […]

Read More…