The carbon emissions of prescribing practices

By Cristina Richie. Health care has a carbon footprint, which contributes to climate change and climate change health hazards, like severe weather, flooding, tornadoes, drought, and anxiety. Carbon emissions come from health care structures and health care activities. Health care structures like hospitals and clinics rely on high-carbon use building materials, heat and cooling, water […]

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Call for papers: Operationalising Fairness in Medical Algorithms

From the BMJ Health & Care Informatics: This special issue aims to bring together the growing community of healthcare practitioners, social scientists, policymakers, engineers and computer scientists to design and discuss practical solutions to address algorithmic fairness and accountability. We are inviting papers that explore ways to reduce machine bias in healthcare or create algorithms that […]

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When the going gets tough, where do persons with disabilities stand? Covid-19 pandemic, community-centered medicine and scarce health resources allocation

By Nicola Panocchia, Viola D’Ambrosio, Serafino Corti, Eluisa Lo Presti, Marco Bertelli, Maria Luisa Scattoni, and Filippo Ghelma The COVID-19 pandemic led to a shift in the medical paradigm from person-centered medicine to community-centered medicine. This shift gives “priority to community health above that of the individual patient in allocating scarce resources”. The patient-physician relationship […]

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How could a pandemic be managed ethically? The rationale for updating the WHO guidance.

By Abha Saxena, Paul Bouvier, Ehsan Shamsi-Gooshki, Johannes Köhler, Lisa Schwartz As the COVID-19 pandemic unfolded, an impressive global research effort was quickly launched to shed light on the subject. Virologists set about dismantling the virus. Pharmacologists began to develop vaccines. Clinicians tested and established treatment strategies against COVID-19. The tools of science were able […]

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COVID-19 human challenge volunteers are neither doing too little, nor helping too late

By Abie Rohrig and David Manheim The world’s first COVID-19 human challenge trial began in early March, with around a dozen healthy, consenting volunteers between the ages of 18-30 deliberately exposed to the virus at a quarantine facility in London. Getz and Baylis recently argued that the questionable harm-benefit ratio of COVID-19 challenge trials make them […]

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Challenge studies for COVID-19: Now is not the time

By Landon J Getz and Francoise Baylis hVIVO, a for-profit clinical research organization in London, in collaboration with Imperial College London, has initiated a human challenge study in youth between the ages of 18 and 30 to determine the dose at which individuals become infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The dose-ranging study, […]

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