Vaccine lotteries for children: Considering the ethics of financial incentives for children

By Nathan Hodson and Ray Jerram. The coronavirus pandemic had enormous consequences for children. Around the world, children missed months or even years of school, losing out on learning, exercise and friendship. Although they generally had far lower morbidity and mortality from SARS-Cov-2, the loss of grandparents and parents affected many. Children were also the […]

Read More…

Mandating flu jab, but not COVID-19 jab, ethically justified for healthcare staff

Press release Few side effects; cuts infection risks; minimises staff shortages and presenteeism And professional obligations to patients trump personal freedom, argue ethicists Mandating the flu jab for healthcare staff is ethically justified, but the same can’t be said of the COVID-19 jab, argue leading ethicists in an extended essay published online in the Journal of […]

Read More…

Don’t stop now: Continuing global engagement on pandemic policy

By Nancy S. Jecker, Caesar A. Atuire With rare exceptions, many people around the world have gleefully shed masks and with them, any lingering concerns about catching the novel coronavirus. Maskless and nonchalant, we are boarding planes, shopping, showing up at parties, enjoying entertainment, and going to in-person classes. Proof of vaccination has also fallen […]

Read More…

Including Black, Indigenous and Latinx communities as partners in the planning and implementation of Long COVID-19 responses: recommendations for enhancing health equity

By Michelle Medeiros, Hillary Edwards, Claudia Baquet. COVID-19 data, where are the holes and what does this mean for Long COVID? As the SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic progresses, the impact of persistent, long-term respiratory, functional, and psychological comorbidities becomes more evident in the general population, and particularly within Black, Indigenous and Latinx communities. Black, Indigenous, and […]

Read More…

Securing a future without COVID-19: The need to prioritise concerted global action on global access to vaccines

By Dr Aisling McMahon & Prof Susi Geiger In the last number of weeks, many emergency pandemic related health measures were removed in Ireland and the UK, and there is an expectation in many other high-income countries that remaining measures will end in the very near future. This news has been greeted with understandable relief […]

Read More…

Was Djokovic unethically blamed and shamed?

By Dominic Wilkinson, Julian Savulescu and Jonathan Pugh. [Cross post from Practical Ethics blog] The decision about whether to grant tennis star Novak Djokovic a visa allowing him to stay in Australia to compete in the Australian Open Championship has generated significant controversy. Last week, the Australian Immigration minister exercised his power to cancel the player’s […]

Read More…

We can’t just follow the science

By Franklin G. Miller.  During the COVID-19 pandemic, a common refrain voiced by many public health experts and government officials in the U.S. is that public policy should “just follow the science.”  For example, consider the following statement by Anthony Fauci, the chief scientific spokesperson for the Biden administration, in an interview published in The […]

Read More…

The ‘haves’ and ‘have-nots’ of PPE in COVID-19

By Cliff Shelton, Kariem El-Boghdadly, John B Appleby. Personal protective equipment (PPE) has been a frequent source of controversy during the COVID-19 pandemic. At times, supplies have run short, leading individuals to purchase (and sometimes improvise) their own PPE; debate has raged over what PPE should be worn in different circumstances; and pictures of healthcare […]

Read More…