Painkillers taken before marathons linked to potentially serious side effects

Attempts to ward off pain in marathons and other endurance sports by taking over the counter painkillers may be ill advised, because these drugs may cause serious side effects in these circumstances, suggests research published in BMJ Open. Many competitors try to prevent pain interfering with their performance by taking painkillers that are readily available […]

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Volcanoes, drug launches and type 2 diabetes: Most read articles in March

  The most-read article in March was Christine Clar and colleagues’ systematic review of SGLT2 receptor inhibitors in type 2 diabetes. Doyle et al‘s  review on the links between patient experience and clinical safety – originally published in January – remains popular,  and Katzmarzyk et al’s article discusses sedentary behaviour and life expectancy in the USA also proves popular as […]

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Drugs and mental health, the mistreatment of clinical interns and evidence-based practice: Most-read articles in February

  The most-read article in February was Al-Shafaee and colleagues’ study of the mistreatment of clinical interns in Oman. Doyle et al‘s  systematic review of the links between patient experience and clinical safety – originally published in January – remains popular,  and Ubbink et al’s newly published scoping review on evidence-based practice was the third most-read. Ward et al‘s paper on […]

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Rock stars, hypnotics and the Olympics: Most read articles in January

  The most read article in January was Doyle et al‘s recently published systematic review of the links between patient experience and clinical safety. Bellis et al‘s much discussed paper on rock star mortality was in second place, followed by Kripke et al‘s study of hypnotics and mortality, originally published almost a year ago. Newly published papers in the top ten […]

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One in 20 cases of pre-eclampsia may be linked to air pollutant

One in every 20 cases of the serious condition of pregnancy, pre-eclampsia, may be linked to increased levels of the air pollutant ozone during the first three months, suggests a large study published in BMJ Open. Mothers with asthma may be more vulnerable, the findings indicate. Pre-eclampsia is characterised by raised blood pressure and the […]

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Around 1 in 10 young mentally ill teens drinks, smokes, and uses cannabis

Around one in 10 young teens with mental health issues also drinks alcohol, smokes cigarettes, and uses cannabis on a weekly basis, indicates Australian research published in BMJ Open. The prevalence of this pattern of substance use increased with age, the study found, prompting the authors to raise concerns that these behaviours are likely to […]

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Using the SPIRIT statement to improve trial protocols

We have updated our instructions for authors to show that we now encourage the use of the SPIRIT statement. SPIRIT (Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Interventional Trials) is ‘an international initiative that aims to improve the quality of clinical trial protocols by defining an evidence-based set of items to address in a protocol’. Its creation […]

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2012 year in review

  2012 was a hugely successful year for BMJ Open. We published four times as many papers as in 2011. Credit for this must go, first and foremost, to the hundreds of reviewers who have given their time to assess manuscripts. We are also grateful that so many authors have chosen to publish with us. […]

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