Top 10 Most Read in August: The incubation period of COVID-19, gender bias in peer review and new face mask testing.

August saw a number of new papers enter BMJ Open’s top 10 most read articles. First up is a rapid systematic review of estimates of the incubation period of COVID-19. The incubation period is the time in days from the point of COVID-19 exposure to the onset of symptoms. Having reliable estimates of the incubation […]

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Top 10 Most Read in May: Women’s experiences of breastfeeding beyond infancy, the birth sex ratio following the 2016 United States presidential election, and the validation of a clinical examination to differentiate a cervicogenic source of headache

 In May, we saw seven new manuscripts enter the BMJ Open’s top 10 most read articles since our last update in February. New in at number one is a qualitative exploration of women’s experiences of breastfeeding beyond infancy in the UK. Thompson et al. interviewed 19 women in breastfeeding support groups and found that they […]

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Top 10 Most Read in December: Routine induction in late-term pregnancies, prevalence of depression in GBMSM and the association between hyperlipidemia and mortality after AMI or ADHF.

December saw three new papers enter BMJ Open’s top 10 most read articles. New to the list this month is a cohort study of routine induction in late-term pregnancies from Denmark. The country introduced a new policy in 2011 aiming to prevent stillbirths and other foetal and maternal complications in post-term pregnancies. Rydahl and colleagues […]

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Top ten most read in November: management of musculoskeletal conditions by physical therapists, inequalities in the rise in infant mortality in England, and the cost and environmental impact of switching to low global warming potential inhalers

The list of the top ten most read articles in November sees many previous entries keeping their places, including a case-control study on antidepressant use during pregnancy and the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus. However, November has also welcomed three new entries into the top ten. New in at number one is a systematic review […]

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Making rare illness visible: engaging people through novel methods of participatory research – Guest Blog

BMJ Open encourages greater involvement of patients in the research process from a study’s conception to the dissemination of its results. In this guest post, Kathy McKay, Veronica Ranieri, and Eilis Kennedy from the Tavistock & Portman NHS Foundation Trust discuss the valuable role that novel participatory methods can play in qualitative health research. Researchers […]

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Top ten most read in August: sex discrimination in access to healthcare in India, sponsorship of professional paediatrics associations by companies that make breast-milk substitutes, and the metabolomic profile of children and adults from the Growing Up in Australia study

The list of the top ten most read articles in BMJ Open in August sees many previous entries retaining their positions, including a cross-sectional study done in Japan investigating the effects of short-term smoking in young patients with untreated intermittent adult-onset asthma, and a systematic review addressing the effects of screentime on the health and […]

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Top 10 Most Read in July: Antidepressants for adult depression, productivity loss due to menstruation-related symptoms and sex differences in the effect of diabetes on major cardiovascular outcomes and all-cause mortality

July saw three new papers enter BMJ Open’s top 10 most read articles. This includes first position, a study by researchers from the Nordic Cochrane Centre in Denmark that reanalyses data from a systematic review and network meta-analysis on antidepressants for depression. Taking into account several biases, their reanalysis suggests that the evidence does not […]

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Child Health CheckPoint series published in BMJ Open

The Child Health CheckPoint is part of the Growing Up in Australia study. It investigates childhood development of 1800 biological parent/child pairs with the aim of producing research that informs health policies. BMJ Open has published a supplement of 15 research articles, including a methodological summary, along with a communication article presenting a broad overview […]

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Top ten most read in May: the association between developmental factors and grip strength in later life, and the impact of occupational distress on the health of doctors in the UK

Maintaining interest at the top of the list of the most-read articles in May is a systematic review assessing the effects of screentime on the health and well-being of children and adolescents. The article presents evidence for associations between screentime and a variety of health harms for this population, including adiposity, unhealthy diet, depressive symptoms, […]

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Top 10 Most Read in April: Morphine in acute coronary syndrome, child maltreatment and mid-adult cardiometabolic markers, and skewed sex ratios at birth in Nepal.

April saw four papers enter into BMJ Open’s top 10 most read articles. The journal’s most read paper in April reviewed the safety of morphine use in acute coronary syndrome. The authors found an association between morphine and increased risk of in-hospital mortality and major adverse cardiovascular events, but this was based on studies with […]

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