Euthanasia, palliative opioid use and palliative sedation: A rejoinder

By Thomas David Riisfeldt. One of my recent essays has generated a considerable amount of critique which I was fortunate to be able to explore in my essay ‘A response to critics: Weakening the ethical distinction between euthanasia, palliative opioid use and palliative sedation’. I will briefly comment on some of these points here. I […]

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“But it’s not my fault”: what not to say when confronting medical errors (even if it’s true)

By Daniel Tigard. Healthcare professionals are only human—at least, for now. As such, they are prone to simple oversights, or even occasional acts of gross negligence. What makes errors in medical contexts especially concerning is, of course, that any failure can have devastating effects. Patients come to healthcare facilities needing attention for some ailment and […]

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Medical ethics is far too important to leave to doctors

By Søren Holm. The rise of ‘professionalism’ as the panacea to all of the ills afflicting the medical profession has led to a resurgence of the idea that medical ethics should be professional ethics, and that the content of this professional ethics should be decided by the profession. In my comment “Roles, professions and ethics – […]

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Public Reason and Physicians’ Duty to Refrain from Religious Discourse

By Jake Greenblum and Ryan Hubbard We recently offered a reply to criticisms of our view that physicians should refrain from deliberating with their patients on religious grounds when helping them make medical decisions.  Part of what prompted our research into this topic is recent work discussing appropriate ways of communicating with religious patients who […]

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