Eugenics and reproductive carrier screening: why would you go there?

By Lisa Dive & Ainsley J Newson. It seems that one of the best ways a bioethics academic can attract an avalanche of very strong opinions is to publish a paper with the word “eugenics” in the title. Why then would we do so? In short, because we consider it important to pay attention to […]

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Who’s responsible for informing relatives about genetic risk?

By Kalle Grill and Anna Rosén. It is established practice in many countries that healthcare professionals encourage patients to share relevant risk information with genetic relatives. We mostly endorse this practice but question a normative assumption that typically underpins it. Both practitioners and academics in the field are in general agreement that: It is desirable […]

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Open future or an informed present? Cancer predispositions testing in children

By Sapna Mehta, Dennis John Kuo. Teenagers, and indeed all children to various extents, live in a world that does not recognize their independence fully.  In various situations, they find their rights being exercised by and interests being defined by parents as well as other authorities such as physicians, teachers and the state to a […]

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“We think you may be at risk of a genetic disease”. Should direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies contact at-risk relatives?

By Philip E Baker and Jordan A Parsons. Direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing is becoming increasingly popular. However, with genetic testing comes the possibility of discovering mutations that confer increased risk of genetic diseases not only to the tested individual (the proband), but also their genetic relatives. This raises the challenging ethical question of what should […]

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