Fetal alcohol syndrome and abortion

By Simon Cushing In several publications, the philosopher Perry Hendricks has pushed an argument that he calls “the impairment argument,” intended to demonstrate that our horror at causing impairments such as fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) to our children in utero should lead us to regard abortion with at least equal horror, as surely death is […]

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Egg freezing in the UK: Recent developments in the broader context of reproductive ageing

By Giulia Cavaliere and James Rupert Fletcher. The UK government has just amended the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 and extended the limit for storing gametes (eggs and sperm) and embryos from 10 to 55 years. Previously, only people with a medical reason, such as infertility caused by cancer treatment, could store their gametes […]

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Neonatology’s brave new world       

By Phillip Wozniak, Ashley Fernandes Could a live baby outside its mother’s womb remain “unborn?” On its face, it seems like an absurd question, but scientific advancement in the field of neonatology has made answering this question a priority. In 2017, Dr. Emily Partridge and her colleagues at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia published the […]

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Eugenics and reproductive carrier screening: why would you go there?

By Lisa Dive & Ainsley J Newson. It seems that one of the best ways a bioethics academic can attract an avalanche of very strong opinions is to publish a paper with the word “eugenics” in the title. Why then would we do so? In short, because we consider it important to pay attention to […]

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Why ‘gestaticide’ is morally equivalent to infanticide

By Daniel Rodger, Nicholas Colgrove, Bruce P. Blackshaw Artificial womb technology may one day permit a fetus to be surgically removed from its mother’s body and placed into an artificial environment, mimicking life in utero. Following Elizabeth Chloe Romanis, let’s call the subjects living inside artificial wombs ‘gestatelings.’ An important question that arises is how […]

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Expanding insurance coverage for in vitro fertilization with pre-implantation genetic testing

By Madison K. Kilbride When prospective parents learn that they’re at risk of passing a genetic condition to their future children, they’re often very concerned. Currently, there are two ways to ensure that one’s biological children do not inherit a hereditary condition. The first is to conceive naturally, use prenatal diagnosis to test the fetus […]

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The public provision of ARTs in England: old arguments, new inequalities

By Laura O’Donovan and Sacha Waxman Criticism of the disparities in the public provision of fertility treatment in England is nothing new. The so-called ‘IVF postcode lottery’ emerged due to widespread divergence in local commissioning policies restricting access to treatment services. Unfairness in that process results not only from the different amounts of treatment available in […]

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