BJSM Podcasts – a year in review

joint-inflammation

Fridays are good days. We hope BJSM podcasts add to that feeling.

2015 marked an exciting year for sports physio / sports medicine podcasts. We loved listening to our colleagues’ podcasts – Jack Chew Physio Matters, Adam Meakins (@AdamMeakins), James MacDonald, the MACP, the Naked Physio and Dr Andy Frankyn-Miller. @BJSM_BMJ will feature on Karen Litzy’s New York-based physiotherapy podcast in 2016.

We tried to continually improve our podcasts for our listeners. Feel free to provide feedback. One BJSM goal was more consistent production quality and we feel we made progress over 2014. Thanks a lot to the very patient & dedicated James Walsh, sound engineer and @SportsOsteopath.  The field has progressed very well from the inception of regular sports physio / sportsmedicine podcasts in 2009.

Big, big thanks to our guests – they ARE the podcasts! http://bjsm.bmj.com/site/podcasts/. These guests are now drawing 10,000 listens per week to the > 200 podcasts on the BJSM channel alone!! We love reading tweets about your favourite episodes, and any pearls you learned while riding the tube or bus to work, so keep them coming! (Is cycling and listening to BJSM podcasts safe?). Big shout out to social media specialist Ania Tarazi for creating the BJSM app on top of everything else.

We welcome your suggestions for 2016: email karim.khan@ubc.ca or tweet @BJSM_BMJ

(you can also check out the mid-year podcast review in this BJSM print article: http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/early/2015/07/06/bjsports-2015-095140)

Below we highlight the 3 most popular podcasts in the last 2 months (Yep, they launched on Fridays). Stay tuned for part two of this series where we profile the most popular podcasts of ALL TIME.

#1. Gold Medal Professor Gwen Jull – Part 1 – Assessment and Management of Neck Pain. First of Two Conversations

Do you treat patients with neck pain? Do you have neck pain? Stop reading and start listening to the podcast. Professor Gwen Jull is one of the most lauded health professionals in the world right now and she shares pearls every minute of this podcast.

Timeline
0:00m – How do you approach the patient aged in the prime of life who complains of neck pain and bad cervical posture?

2:00m – “Big development in physiotherapy is the assessment /examination which then forms the basis of our treatment” – movement and also how the movement is performed. Facet joint tests, muscle coordination.

3:10m – Detailed specific assessment of posture in the patient with neck pain. Have the patient adopt the work positions. Aim to correct the posture to see if pain changes.

5:10m – How to distinguish the superficial and deep neck extensors

8:30m – 3 trajectories in whiplash patients; folks who get better fairly rapidly (50%), those who suffer persistent mild pain (> 2years, 30%), and ‘the major worry’ of those who have persistent moderate to high levels of pain for many months and sometimes going on for years. What predicts these trajectories? “The last group is a real stumbling block for all professions”.

11:00m – Predictors of the poor outcomes.

Follow THIS LINK for the complete timeline.

#2. Silver Medal Keeping runners running: the secrets of running assessment – advice and exercise progressions

Mo Farah has great running technique. You see it, you know it. But what are the elements of Mo Farah’s running style? Can we assess running patients and guide them to improve their technique? Might gait education prove more effective than medication to treat symptoms? Andy Cornelius has the answers. He’s a Graduate Sport Rehabilitator and head running coach who works in private clinics, premiership football and with high profile clubs and athletes. Posing the questions is Stephen Aspinall, Chairman of the British Association of Sports Rehabilitators and Trainers (BASRaT – www.basrat.org) and Lecturer in Sport Rehabilitation at the University of Salford, England.

Timeline
1:20m – What are the key elements of running assessment?

2:45m – What you can learn by watching the runner from behind (frontal plane) and the side (sagittal plane) on the track and on the treadmill.

4:08m – The runner with injuries related to overstriding. What is overstriding? What can the clinician advise?

6:00m – Assessing cadence and helping the athlete to make a change of between 5-10% in cadence.

Follow THIS LINK for a complete timeline

#3. Bronze Medal Prof Stephen Phinney on the science behind low carb diets for athletes: A rational approach

Consider the classic understanding that high carbohydrate intakes are necessary for optimal endurance performance. What if that failed to take into account the physiological changes that occur with adaptation to low carbohydrate diets? In this podcast, @JohannWindt interviews physician-researcher Dr. Stephen Phinney about his last 30 years of research into low-carb ketogenic diets. Highlights include the previously undocumented levels of during exercise fat oxidation seen in endurance athletes adapted to a low carbohydrate diet. He also touches on ketogenic diets’ potential benefits in other sporting contexts, addresses common criticisms, and looks ahead to future research questions in the field.

Further reading and papers discussed in the podcast are included below.

Vermont and MIT Study Dr. Phinney’s original two studies on low carbohydrate performance. Original two low carb performance studies.
www.metabolismjournal.com/article/0026…5-1/abstract
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC371554/

Phinney SD et al. The human metabolic response to chronic ketosis without caloric restriction: physical and biochemical adaptation. Metabolism 1983;32:757-68.
www.metabolismjournal.com/article/0026…5-1/abstract

Phinney SD et al. capacity for moderate exercise in obese subjects after adaptation to a hypocaloric, ketogenic diet. J Clin Invest 1980;66:1152-61.
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC371554/

The gymnast study mentioned in the podcast: Paoli et al. Ketogenic diet does not affect strength performance in elite artistic gymnasts.
J Int Soc Sports Nutr 2012; 9: 34.
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3411406/

Significant decrease in inflammation shown in low carb diets by Forsythe, Phinney, et al.Comparison of low fat and low carbohydrate diets on circulating fatty acid composition and markers of inflammation. Lipids 2008;43:65-77.
link.springer.com/article/10.1007/…7?no-access=true

Prof Phinney’s recent BJSM Editorial: Noakes T, Volek JS, Phinney SD. Low-carbohydrate diet for athletes: what evidence? Br J Sports Med 2014
bjsm.bmj.com/content/early/2014…014-093824.extract

Prof Phinney and Volek’s website– Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living/Performance www.artandscienceoflowcarb.com/

In the August 2015 issue of BJSM you’ll find a series of paper on weight loss and physical activity: bjsm.bmj.com/content/49/14.toc

Dr Aseem Malhotra’s paper: It’s time to bust the myth of physical inactivity and obesity: you can’t outrun a bad diet (if you want to be thin) bjsm.bmj.com/content/49/15/967.full (OPEN ACCESS) Coauthors are Professor Phinney and Professor Timothy Noakes (@ProfTimNoakes).

Professor Stephen Blair’s rebuttal: Physical inactivity and obesity is not a myth: Dr Steven Blair comments on Dr Aseem Malhotra’s editorial bjsm.bmj.com/content/49/15.toc

Professor Kamal Mahtani’s editorial: Physical activity and obesity editorial: is exercise pointless or was it a pointless exercise? bjsm.bmj.com/content/49/15/969.extract

Two relevant BJSM podcasts include:

1) Professor Tim Noakes interviewed by Professor Peter Brukner ow.ly/PQlld
2) Dr Aseem Malhotra discussing the debate around his editorial above ow.ly/PQlNL

BJSM editors appreciate that nutrition is a controversial issue (not sure why, but that’s OK) so please note the Prof Phinney’s competing interests are listed in bjsm.bmj.com/content/49/15/967.full BJSM revels in debate and publishes quality material. Hence, you can see divergent views represented above and we have commissioned an editorial from respected scientists who feel that protein, or carbohydrate, deserves greater prominence. Your submissions are welcome via the BJSM’s various channels – ‘print’, rapid response, blog, Google plus community, twitter, Facebook. Or email karim.khan@ubc.ca

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