Music Composition to Explore Delirium in Hospital: A Johannesburg-Based Study

by Victoria Hume For the last few years I’ve been writing music about delirium – a state often induced by being in hospital and which can be characterised by paranoia, delusion and hallucination. It is immensely common, with a documented prevalence of around 20% in ‘normal’ care[1][2] rising to 87% peak incidence in intensive care.[3][4] […]

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A Reflection on the Past, Present and Future of Critical Health and Medical Humanities in Malawi

by Chisomo Kalinga On 24–26 August 2017, the University of Malawi’s Chancellor College in Zomba hosted its first international medical humanities conference, which was funded by the Wellcome Trust. It was an honour to be part of the team that helped support this initiative with our hosts. Scholars, creative practitioners, policymakers, NGOs and members of […]

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Special Issue Focus: Medical Humanities in Africa

‘Medical and Health Humanities in Africa – Inclusion, Access, and Social Justice’ “Wamkelekile, karibu, welkom, and welcome,” begins the introduction to this special issue, guest edited by Carla Tsampiras[1], Nolwazi Mkhwanazi[2], and Victoria Hume[3]. In this, our final issue of 2018, we are pleased to present works from parts of Africa on the subject of […]

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It’s a women’s film world

By Khalid Ali, film and media correspondent In its 40th edition, the Cairo International Film Festival (CIFF), 20-29 November 2018 (https://www.ciff.org.eg/), pays special tribute to nine outstanding Arab women directors. A distinguishing feature shared by these directors is that they tell stories which are deeply rooted in their respective cultures, but still manage to connect […]

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When Horizons Intersect: Reflections on Collaborative, Patient-Centred Care

by Austin Lam While ‘patient-centred care’ is an often used phrase, the question bears asking: what underlies such a broad concept? As a medical student with a background in philosophy, I have endeavoured to integrate my journey in medicine with a philosophical sensibility. Part of that has led me to reflect on the meaning of […]

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Using photography to enhance GP trainees’ reflective practice and professional development

Few would argue against the value of the ability to reflect upon one’s actions and one’s practice more broadly. According to photographic artist Rutherford, general practitioner Emer Forde, together with colleagues Jacqueline Priego-Hernandez, Aurelia Butcher and Clare Wedderburn, ‘reflection can foster professionalism, empathy and attitudinal changes’. In making this point, they highlight the Royal College […]

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Blind alleys and dead ends: researching innovation in late 20th century surgery

How do medical innovations evolve? In “Blind alleys and dead ends: researching innovation in late 20th century surgery,” Harriet Palfreman and Roger Kneebone examine the fortunes of a surgical innovation—the PCCL (percutaneous cholecystolithotomy) treatment of gallstones—in the late 20th century. In 1988, eight patients underwent the procedure, which required extracting the gallstones using an endoscope […]

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Women, ‘madness’ and exercise

“Exercise is not politically neutral,” writes Jennifer Jane Hardes. That is, “within what has been declared a ‘risk society’ exercise ought to be examined critically as a new potential mode of self-regulation.” In what is both a concise and rich account “of knowledges about exercise and women’s mental health that emerged throughout the late 19th […]

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