Public reactions to non-invasive prenatal testing funding in England, France and Germany: The case of Heidi Crowter and Maire Lea-Wilson in England.

By Adeline Perrot and Ruth Horn The introduction of non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) into public health systems in recent years has been the subject of controversy in England, France and Germany. In England, for example, the ‘Don’t Screen Us Out’ campaign recently supported the case of Crowter and Lea-Wilson, challenging the UK Secretary of State […]

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Why we must resist proposals for routine screening for alcohol in pregnancy

By Rebecca Bennett and Catherine Bowden Since a link was established between alcohol consumption in pregnancy and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) there have been attempts to reduce women’s alcohol consumption during pregnancy. As a result, many jurisdictions, including the UK have taken what is called ‘abstinence only approach’ as the basis for all policies […]

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Conscientious objection, the referral requirement and morally permissible moral mistakes

By Nathan Emmerich In a recent paper, Nir Ben-Moshe suggested that the problems of moral complicity associated with conscientious objection—such as those generated by requiring those who conscientiously object to the termination of pregnancy or to voluntary assisted dying to refer patients to non-objecting providers—are in need of a ‘a creative solution.’  My paper Conscientious […]

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Three observations about justifying AI

By Anantharaman Muralidharan, G Owen Schaefer, Julian Savulescu. Consider the following kind of medical AI. It consists of 2 parts. The first part consists of a core deep machine learning algorithm. These blackbox algorithms may be more accurate than human judgment or interpretable algorithms, but are notoriously opaque in terms of telling us on what […]

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Securing a future without COVID-19: The need to prioritise concerted global action on global access to vaccines

By Dr Aisling McMahon & Prof Susi Geiger In the last number of weeks, many emergency pandemic related health measures were removed in Ireland and the UK, and there is an expectation in many other high-income countries that remaining measures will end in the very near future. This news has been greeted with understandable relief […]

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Was Djokovic unethically blamed and shamed?

By Dominic Wilkinson, Julian Savulescu and Jonathan Pugh. [Cross post from Practical Ethics blog] The decision about whether to grant tennis star Novak Djokovic a visa allowing him to stay in Australia to compete in the Australian Open Championship has generated significant controversy. Last week, the Australian Immigration minister exercised his power to cancel the player’s […]

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Getting “done” for concealment of pregnancy: Does a woman have a duty to inform healthcare staff of her pregnancy status?

By Gemma McKenzie. In England a pregnant woman – like any adult with mental capacity – enjoys the rights to autonomy and bodily integrity. As a result, she can only be subjected to a medical intervention with her informed consent. The law does not consider a human fetus as a separate legal entity; therefore, a […]

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