‘Was this on the consent form?’ Can you really consent in a one-off conversation to interventions with uncertain and evolving consequences?

By Rachel Horton, Benjamin Bell, Angela Fenwick, Anneke Lucassen A child conceived with a donated egg has multiple health problems but no unifying diagnosis. Given that testing of biological parents may help make a genetic diagnosis in a child, is it OK to contact the child’s anonymous egg donor to ask if they would provide […]

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It is time the law stopped incentivising confidentiality: bringing duties of care more in line with professional guidance

By Michael Fay and Edward Dove ABC v St George’s Healthcare (2017) is an important legal decision, and its return to court in November 2019 will be no less significant for doctors’ duties of care. Currently, a doctor is subject to a duty of care to their patient. A doctor also has a corresponding duty […]

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Privacy: Don’t Get Over It

By Elias Aboujaoude Account hacks. Revenge porn. Identity theft. Cyberstalking. Psychographic targeting. Facial recognition. Government surveillance. It’s enough to give up and agree with the devastatingly prescient remark from 1999 by the founder of Sun Microsystems: “You have zero privacy anyway. Get over it.” In a post-privacy world, victims of technology-enabled privacy violations look to […]

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HIV-positive to HIV-negative living donor liver transplant – Life and death decisions

By Harriet Rosanne Etheredge, June Fabian, Mary Duncan, Francesca Conradie, Caroline Tiemessen, Jean Botha Waiting for legislative change in organ transplantation in South Africa feels like “Waiting for Godot”, especially considering the extreme shortage of donor organs in our country.  Anyone who has seen Samuel Beckett’s iconic play by that name will appreciate that as […]

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Charging migrant women for pregnancy care is a worrying sign of the times

By Arianne Shahvisi and Fionnuala Finnerty Precious is a 26-year-old Eritrean woman who has recently arrived in the UK. She wishes to apply for asylum but is yet to do so. Precious is destitute and is living in a church and relying on the kindness of the Eritrean community. She sees a GP at an […]

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How should crisis sedation be presented to dying patients at risk of a catastrophic event?

By Dr Nathan Emmerich and Prof Bert Gordijn When we consider the end of our life and the actual circumstances of our death the vast majority of us would prefer to go peacefully, perhaps dying of simple old age at the end of a life well lived. Unfortunately, this is not always possible. Whilst the […]

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When is it ethical to pay clinical trial participants different amounts?

By Govind Persad, Holly Fernandez Lynch, and Emily Largent. This collaboration grew out of our shared experience as scholars studying research ethics and (for some of us) as institutional review board members. We witnessed debates over when, if ever, it can be fair to pay different participants in the same study different amounts of money. […]

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