Fetal exposure to moderate/high caffeine levels linked to excess childhood weight gain

Should mums-to-be cut out caffeine altogether, ask the researchers? Exposure to moderate to high caffeine levels while in the womb is linked to excess weight gain in early childhood, suggests a large observational study published in the online journal BMJ Open. The findings, which back general advice to limit caffeine intake while pregnant, prompt the […]

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Alcohol intake may be linked to premenstrual syndrome (PMS)

Around 1 in 10 cases worldwide might be associated with drinking, estimate the researchers Drinking alcohol may be linked to pre-menstrual syndrome, or PMS for short, suggests a pooled analysis of published study data in the online journal BMJ Open. Based on the global prevalence of alcohol drinking and their study findings, the Spanish researchers […]

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Huge variation in prescribing practice for gluten free foods in England

Those in most deprived areas least likely to get a prescription Prescribing practice for gluten free foods in England varies hugely, and doesn’t seem to be driven by obvious medical factors, reveals research published in the online journal BMJ Open. And those living in the most deprived areas of the country are the least likely […]

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Top 10 Most Read in March: dietary fats and changes in cardiovascular risk factors, declaration of conflicts of interest by clinicians and the association between eating speed and obesity

March saw a varied selection of articles enter the Top 10 Most Read. In the top spot, and receiving quite a bit of attention on social media, is a randomised trial by Khaw et al looking at coconut oil, olive oil and butter as dietary fats and the changes in blood lipid profile, weight, fat distribution […]

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Poor practice on conflict of interest in NHS may be damaging trust in clinicians

US-style statutory body needed to ensure all trusts have strong policies in place, say researchers Many NHS trusts in England are failing to log, track, or disclose information on conflicts of interest (COI) for their staff, so potentially undermining public trust in health professionals, suggests research published in the online journal BMJ Open. A statutory […]

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New requirements for patient and public involvement statements in BMJ Open

Patient partnership at The BMJ: Walking the talk In 2014, The BMJ launched it’s patient partnership strategy, seeking “to promote patient partnership by walking the talk“. The strategy, informed by an international patient advisory panel, launched a number of innovative editorial practices, including patient peer review and patient co-production of educational articles. Listening to patients’ voices […]

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Surgeries employing GPs with additional training in complementary medicine appear less likely to prescribe antibiotics

Use of complementary/alternative medicine may help reduce over prescribing of antibiotics GP surgeries with doctors who also have training in complementary and alternative medicines appear to be less likely to prescribe antibiotics to patients and may hold the key to reducing over-prescribing of these drugs, suggests a study published in the journal BMJ Open. Inappropriate […]

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Top 10 most read in February: Eating speed and obesity, micronutrients in low-carbohydrate diets, high-carbohydrate intake and obesity, urinary bisphenol A in teenagers

  Eight new entries made it into BMJ Open’s top 10 most read articles in February. New in at number one is a secondary analysis of longitudinal data by Hurst & Fukuda, which examined the association between lifestyle factors, including eating speed, and obesity in Japanese patients with diabetes. The authors demonstrated that slower eating […]

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2016 junior doctor strikes in England had ‘significant impact’ on healthcare provision

Thousands of appointments cancelled; effects greatest when emergency care withdrawn The 2016 junior doctors strikes in England had a ‘significant’ impact on the provision of healthcare, with thousands of appointments cancelled, and significantly fewer admissions and A&E attendances than expected, reveals research published in the online journal BMJ Open. The effects were greatest during the last of […]

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