Top 10 Most Read in February: Associations between SES and adverse birth outcomes in Canada, the use of hormones among transgender women in Nepal and the effects of introducing PrEP programmes in Sweden

In February, we saw five new papers enter BMJ Open’s list of top 10 most read articles. New entries include a protocol for a systematic review and meta analysis that aims to examine the effects of physical activity interventions on the BMI of children and adolescents in Latin america, and a study into the use […]

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Top ten most read in September: Old age decline in grip strength, LGBTQ perspectives in child welfare, and opioid use in back pain

The list of the top ten most read articles in September sees many previous entries keeping their places, including a cohort study into the association between developmental factors and old age decline in grip strength. However, September has also welcomed two new entries into the top ten. New in at number six is a study […]

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Guest blog: Improving peer review using peer-reviewed studies #PeerRevWk16

This week is the second ever “peer review week”. The theme for this year is “Recognition for Review”. Peer review week aims to highlight the importance of peer review, which is a crucial part of the research process. We asked Dr Adrian Barnett, from the Queensland University of Technology, and a member of our editorial board, to survey […]

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Peer Review Week: An analysis of peer review style and quality

This week celebrates the first ever Peer Review Week; a collaborative concept from ORCID, Wiley, Sense About Science and ScienceOpen, to highlight and celebrate the invaluable role peer review plays in scientific and medical publishing. Here at BMJ Open we are, of course, advocates of open peer review and as such are pleased to be publishing […]

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Comparing the results from two surveys of BMJ Open authors

  BMJ Open authors were among those surveyed by Professor David J Solomon of Michigan State University for a study recently published in the journal PeerJ. Needless to say we read this with great interest (we were unaware of the survey until the results were published). The survey reported a generally positive response to BMJ Open […]

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Thank you to our reviewers – 2013

Peer review is a fundamental part of publishing. Perhaps nowhere more so than in the open access field, which is often more scrutinised than other traditional publishing routes. Recognising this, the BMJ Open team would like to thank all 2725 peer reviewers who refereed for the journal in 2013 – your advice and considered remarks […]

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BMJ Open’s first birthday

  It is a year today that BMJ Open published its first papers: prompting donuts all round! We have now published over 230 open access research articles, covering niche topics and major public health issues alike. Several articles have received plenty of press coverage. Some have prompted considerable national debate, such as this paper suggesting that there […]

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