BMJ Open: highlights from 2016 in review

In 2011 BMJ Open appeared on the medical publishing scene becoming, in only five years, the world’s largest general medical journal (2015 – Five years old and growing). Another year has passed since then, and thanks to defining our distinctive identity, and being rigorous, open and transparent, we have continued to grow consistently and steadily, […]

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Top 10 most read: Work-life balance of doctors in training, ultra-processed foods and added sugars in the US diet, and quality of life and visual function in patients with age-related macular degeneration

December’s top 10 most read list sees eight new entries. At number one this month is a qualitative study by Rich et al, which investigates the work-life balance of doctors undertaking post graduate medical training in the UK. The authors conducted semistructured focus groups and interviews with medical trainees and trainers and found a lack of work life balance […]

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Paternal involvement in child-rearing, health anxiety, and the global epidemiology of alcohol use: Most read articles in November

Paternal involvement in early child-rearing, health anxiety and risk of ischaemic heart disease, and the global epidemiology of alcohol use The Top 10 Most Read list for November contains a number of new entries including papers on the reasons for retraction of articles, and the relationship between earlobe creases and coronary artery disease. At number […]

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Volunteering and mental health, breast feeding outcomes and condom use intentions: Most read articles in August

Association of volunteering and mental well-being, breast feeding outcomes and place of birth, and condom use intentions of heterosexual men The August most read list contains papers with a number of different study designs, on a number of different topics. Returning to the top spot this month is a systematic review on the lack of […]

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Complimentary therapies, well-being and consultants as victims of bullying: Most read articles in July.

  July’s top 10 most read papers sees two studies taking into account doctors’ points of view. The first, by Bourne et al., takes a closer look at look at which aspects of the complaints process they find the most stressful. The second, by Shabazz et al., uses a survey of Royal College of Obstetricians […]

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Prolonged sitting, non-fatal self-harm, and institutional mental healthcare: Most read articles in May

Prolonged sitting and fatigue, non-fatal self-harm, and trends in institutional mental healthcare in Western Europe This month sees a mixture of some old favourites and some new entries in the Top 10 Most Read list. First up is a pilot study by Wennberg et al which uses a randomised two-condition crossover trial to compare the acute effects of uninterrupted sitting […]

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Prenatal exposure to cannabis, overdiagnosis, and counterfeit medicines: Most read articles in April

Prenatal exposure to cannabis, public definitions of overdiagnosis, and counterfeit medicines in Peru The Top 10 Most Read papers list this month contains a number of new entries, many of which have been published within the current issue. They come from a wide range of of areas and some have attracted attention via press release, blogs and discussion […]

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Ultra-processed foods, drinks marketed to children, and cannabis use in psychosis: Most read articles in March

Ultra-processed foods and added sugars, the content of drinks marketed to children, and cannabis use in first episode psychosis March was a busy month here at BMJ Open, with many new papers entering the Top 10 Most Read. In at number one this month is a popular paper which was press released and saw a lot […]

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Medical writing support, postnuclear disaster evacuation, and publication culture: Most read articles in February

Medical writing support and the quality of reporting, postnuclear disaster evacuation, and the current publication culture Once again, this month sees a selection of new papers entering the Top 10 Most Read list, alongside some old favourites. Returning to the top spot this month is Teschke et al‘s paper on bicycling injury hospitalisation rates, which continues to attract attention and […]

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The NHS Health Check in England, bereavement by suicide, and public involvement in medical research: Most read articles in January

NHS Health Checks, the risks of bereavement by suicide, and public involvement in medical research The Top 10 Most Read list for January is almost completely comprised of new entries, with the exception of the ever popular review by Kristensen et al on the effects of statins. In the top spot this month is an evaluation […]

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