Top 10 most read in November: portable HEPA filters for COVID-19, models and frameworks in healthcare

We have two new entries to the most read list in November, including a new entry at number 1. Read more on these two articles below.

New entry and most read
Effect of portable HEPA filters on COVID-19 period prevalence: an observational quasi-interventional study in German kindergartens
This observational study by Falkenberg et al. is a new entry this month, and it is also the most read article for November. The study aimed to evaluate the effect of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters in kindergartens in Germany, during the COVID-19 pandemic. Data from thousands of children from 32 kindergartens were collected, and it was found that while the HEPA filters did significantly reduce the viral load in the air in the rooms, they did not lead to a reduced prevalence of COVID-19 in the kindergartens. In fact, the use of the HEPA filters might lead to a sense of security, reducing preventive behaviours.

by Engin_Akyurt via Pixabay

 

 

 

 

 

 

New entry
Evidence-based practice models and frameworks in the healthcare setting: a scoping review
Another new entry into the most read list in November was this scoping review by Dusin et al., looking to identify and review current evidence-based practice (EBP) models and frameworks. The authors identified relevant published articles from January 1990 to April 2022, with 19 models and frameworks meeting the criteria. The study found that many EBP models and frameworks currently exist, providing diverse instructions. The inclusion of patient values and preferences needs to be better integrated into EBP models and frameworks, and expertise and knowledge to assess evidence must be considered when choosing an EBP model or framework.

 

*Most read figures are based on pdf downloads and full text views. Abstract views are excluded. 

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Rank* Author(s) Title
1 Falkenberg et al. Effect of portable HEPA filters on COVID-19 period prevalence: an observational quasi-interventional study in German kindergartens
2 Alami et al. Risk of myocarditis and pericarditis in mRNA COVID-19-vaccinated and unvaccinated populations: a systematic review and meta-analysis
3 van Dijk et al. Artificial intelligence in systematic reviews: promising when appropriately used
4 Wang et al. Global, regional and national burden of inflammatory bowel disease in 204 countries and territories from 1990 to 2019: a systematic analysis based on the Global Burden of Disease Study 2019
5 Ferreira et al. Career intentions of medical students in the UK: a national, cross-sectional study (AIMS study)
6 Walker et al. Impact of fatigue as the primary determinant of functional limitations among patients with post-COVID-19 syndrome: a cross-sectional observational study
7 Edmund Pigott et al. What are the treatment remission, response and extent of improvement rates after up to four trials of antidepressant therapies in real-world depressed patients? A reanalysis of the STAR*D study’s patient-level data with fidelity to the original research protocol
8 Mamun et al.
9 Dusin et al. Evidence-based practice models and frameworks in the healthcare setting: a scoping review
10 Keedle et al. What women want if they were to have another baby: the Australian Birth Experience Study (BESt) cross-sectional national survey

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