The value of health professional networks in tackling vaccine hesitancy; an engagement exercise with the Chief Medical Officer by Samia Latif and colleagues

‘If you want to go fast, go alone If you want to go far, go with others’ (African proverb) Much has been said and written about vaccine hesitancy and health inequalities in Black, Asian, and ethnic minority (BAME) communities, particularly during the Covid pandemic. Lower vaccine uptake and access to health services by BAME communities […]

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Creating tomorrow today: seven simple rules for leaders. Blog three: Root our transformation efforts in a sense of belonging by Helen Bevan and Göran Henriks

We have created a set of “seven simple rules” for leaders who want to create tomorrow today, based on our collective learning over seven decades as leaders and internal change agents in the health and care systems in England and Sweden and the work we have done with leaders in health and care in many […]

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When the cupcakes are not enough. The case for improving delirium awareness through involving all carers by Shibley Rahman

I like cupcakes a lot, but photos of them on Twitter in support of “World Delirium Awareness Day” today will not effect the change we need to see in delirium care. How can this change actually take place?  I believe strongly that organisations should primarily look beyond their immediate organisation, and include family carers in […]

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Can Swiss Cheese Modelling be used to design processes that protect against workplace discrimination? by Ali Raza

According to the ‘Swiss Cheese Model’ propounded by James Reason, complex systems can yield losses when flaws in defences against hazards become aligned. Flaws in latent conditions at the ‘blunt’ organisational end permit active failures to be committed at the ‘sharp end’ by individuals (1). The ‘Swiss Cheese’ approach has commonly been regarded to have […]

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Social care, leadership and COVID: a tangled mix by Richard Humphries and Nicholas Timmins

COVID-19 has thrown social care in England into the spotlight in a way that nobody would have wanted. The death toll in care homes, in people’s own homes, and among care staff. The desperate early struggle to get personal protective equipment to carers that mirrored the problems in the NHS, but at times seemed worse. […]

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