A Conscience Clause with Claws

There’s a flurry of papers on conscientious objection in the latest JME: Giles Birchley argues, taking his cue from Arendt, that conscientious objection has a place in medicine here; Sophie Strickland’s paper on medical students’ attitude to conscientious objection (which I mentioned in July) is here; and Morten Magelssen wonders when conscientious objection should be accepted here. […]

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Genetic Modification and Comparative Advantage (aka Musing about Kant 3)

David Jensen’s paper in the latest JME considers a possible Kantian argument against the use of genetic enhancement for the sake of comparative advantage in one’s children.  Essentially, the argument rests on the idea that the maxim describing such a course of action would not be universalisable; universalised, it would be self-defeating, since the very […]

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Conscientious Objection and What Makes a Medic

Francesca Minerva has drawn my attention to this paper by Sophie Strickland, currently available as a pre-publication download via the JME homepage, concerning conscientious objection among UK medical students. Students were invited to respond to a set of questions in an online poll to determine whether there were procedures to which they’d object, and in which […]

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MSF Dilemma # 3: Re-Infibulation

This is the third of the dilemmas considered here. To allow childbirth, it is necessary to surgically open an infibulation.  After delivery, women (and their husbands) ask for restoration of the infibulation (re-infibulation), which involves re-suturing. MSF opposes re-infibulation and works to ensure that it is not undertaken in its delivery facilities.  Although MSF opposes this practice, […]

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New JME, New Threads

The editor’s choice paper in the latest JME is Sheather and Shah’s “Ethical Dilemmas in Medical Humanitarian Practice: Cases for reflection from Medecins Sans Frontières”.  Because it’s the editors’ choice, you should be able to access it for free. The paper outlines four moral dilemmas, each presented with an ethicist’s response. Over the next day or […]

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Assisted Suicide in Oregon: a Counterblast from the Antis

Ilora Finlay and Rob George* have a new paper in the JME that takes issue with Battin et al‘s 2007 paper, concerning who makes use of physician assisted suicide in Oregon and Holland.  Battin’s claim had been that there was no evidence of heightened risk for the elderly, women, the uninsured (inapplicable in the Netherlands, where […]

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