Evidence Watch: Carl Heneghan’s selection of evidence that impacts on practice

  This week’s Evidence Watch highlights the risk of pre-eclampsia with metformin, the role of repeated influenza vaccination, de-prescribing medications and assessing harms in the elderly at the time of elective surgery. Carl Heneghan, Editor in Chief A meta-analysis evaluating the risk of pre-eclampsia in women taking metformin before, or during pregnancy found that there […]

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What do we mean by Informed Health Choice?

  In BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine, Iain Chalmers and colleagues set out the Key concepts for Informed Health Choices. Carl Heneghan Shared Decision Making, according to NHS England, means patients can review all the treatment options available to them and participate actively with their healthcare professional in making that decision. The National Institute for Health and […]

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What makes a systematic review “complex”?

  Originally published on BMJ Opinion Kamal R Mahtani, Tom Jefferson, and Carl Heneghan discuss:  What makes a systematic review “complex”? Systematic reviews involve systematically searching for all available evidence, appraising the quality of the included studies, and synthesising the evidence into a useable form. They contribute to the pool of best available evidence, translating […]

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Why do rates of knee arthroscopy differ?

  A recent trial of keyhole knee surgery for partial meniscectomy showed surgical intervention was ineffective. Surgery rates have varied markedly over time and across the UK, suggesting there is a lot of overtreatment.  Carl Heneghan Published in the Annals of Rheumatic Diseases the randomised trial reported arthroscopic partial meniscectomy was no more effective than […]

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BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine Strategy

  BMJ EBM publishes original evidence-based research, insights and opinions on what matters for health care. Carl Heneghan, Editor in Chief, BMJ EBM The BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine strategy focuses on the tools, methods, and concepts that are basic and central to practising evidence-based medicine.     How we deliver relevant, trustworthy and impactful evidence: By Disseminating relevant research: saving […]

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Is it the end for type 2 diabetes monitoring?

  More intense monitoring makes no difference to outcomes in type 2 diabetes and costs a lot more, but not everyone agrees on what should be done in practice. Carl Heneghan,  Ben Goldacre Glucose self-monitoring with automated feedback messaging in type 2 diabetics not taking insulin makes no difference to patient outcomes and costs a lot […]

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