Art Review: Visions of Multiple Sclerosis

  Hannah Laycocks’s Visions of Multiple Sclerosis: Perceiving Identity Reviewed by Shahd Alshammari, PhD.   When artists’ work is considered provocative, you usually think that their choice of subject is taboo. While certainly not “taboo”, the disabled body, and even more interestingly the “invisible disabled body”, in itself a paradox, is a subject that medical […]

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Physicians and Magicians: A Magical Education in Life, Death, Power, Potions and Defence Against the Dark Arts by Fiona Dogan and Mark Harper

Abstract The worlds of magic and medicine both involve the sudden initiation of an intimate relationship between two complete strangers – the magician and their subject, or the doctor and their patient. Magic requires the subject to have some degree of trust in the magician, to accept that props and setting may be required to […]

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The Artist in Theatre: On the Primacy of the Subjective Narrative by Jac Saorsa

Drawing Women’s Cancer explores the lived experience of gynaecological illness through a unique interrelation between art and medical science. Based in Cardiff and supported by Cardiff University and Cardiff and Vale University Health Board, the project began in 2012 as a collaboration between myself and Amanda Tristram, gynaecological surgeon. Since then it has produced two […]

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Artist Mark Gilbert and his Portraits of Care: Medical Humanities’ Editors Choice

Anyone lucky enough to have come across or been engaged with Mark Gilbert’s work in the Changing Faces exhibition will be pleased to hear that more of his work is now publicly available. http://mh.bmj.com/content/suppl/2010/06/23/36.1.5.DC1/MH_Appendix_003780.pdf One of Mark’s paintings, Jarad, featured on the cover of the June issue of Medical Humanities and I would urge you to go […]

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Can a comic a day keep the doctor away? GP Ian Williams thinks so

In these uncertain economic times there seems to be a growing nostalgia for the more simple things in life. Home baking and dressmaking is on the rise and many families are anticipating a less commercialised festive get together. Although some of this return to basics is undoubtedly driven by economic imperatives, anecdotal evidence seems to […]

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“August: Osage County”, a play not to miss: London November 21, 2008 – January 21, 2009

There are some plays that leave you, quite literally, breathless with awe.  Osage County is one of them. At 3 hours and 20 minutes, this remarkable play is longer than average, and so it’s a tribute to the brilliance of the script, staging, direction and acting that it nevertheless rushes by. Watching Osage County in […]

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