Why We Need to Address Surgery in Low-Resource Countries ?

Surgery remains grossly neglected in global health. This particularly affects low-resource settings with weak surgical health systems. ‘Global surgery’ is the term now adopted to describe the rapidly developing field seeking to address this, although recognition of this emerging multidisciplinary area is still evolving. To help define this interface between surgery, anaesthesia, and public health, […]

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The public health imperative for advancing emergency care research in LMICs

Strong emergency care systems based on robust evidence are critical to advancing global health. Every minute counts when a patient is afflicted with a potentially life-threatening symptom or condition, and therefore it might seem daunting to consider conducting research in such acute conditions. But investment in emergency care research will be critical to achieving national […]

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Global Surgery doesn’t belong to the English Language

The English language cannot lay claim to the origins of surgical practice. Billroth and Langenbeck described their work in German; Dupuytren and Larrey in French; and Sushrutha in Sanskrit. During the twentieth century, English became the lingua franca of science (1). Its current status in academic communication creates both advantages and liabilities for academic global […]

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Adesoji Ademuyiwa: Improving child survival following emergency surgery

As a paediatric surgeon in Nigeria, my experience is that child survival following emergency surgery is lower compared to children in more developed countries. This is especially the case in the neonatal period. Studies in countries with a low to middle Human Development Index (HDI) have documented several challenges associated with this issue—delays in presentation […]

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