Top 10 Most Read in September: Survey of British sexual attitudes and lifestyles, the harms of light drinking in pregnancy, and antiretroviral therapies for pregnant women living with HIV or hepatitis B.

  8 new entries make it into September’s top 10 most read articles. In first place is a study by Cynthia Graham and colleagues that reports findings from a cross-sectional survey of sexual attitudes and lifestyles in the UK. From data on 4839 men and 6669 women aged 16–74 years who reported ≥1 sexual partner in the […]

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Editors’ picks

BMJ Open: September Editors’ Picks       Each month the editorial team at BMJ Open select highlights from our recently published articles. We hope you enjoy our September highlights. You can access all the material published in September here.    Improving peer review of biomedical research: are interventions effective? Peer review is considered the best method […]

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Evidence for potential harms of light drinking in pregnancy ‘surprisingly’ limited

But review confirms alcohol best avoided ‘just in case’, say researchers The evidence for the potentially harmful effects of light or occasional drinking in pregnancy is ‘surprisingly limited,’ but women are still better off avoiding all alcohol while pregnant, just in case, concludes a pooled analysis of the available data, published in the online journal […]

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People with disabilities face major hurdles accessing healthcare in UK

Disabled women are particularly disadvantaged People with disabilities in the UK face major hurdles accessing healthcare, reveals research published in the online journal BMJ Open. Disabled women are particularly disadvantaged, the findings show around one in five (19%) people in the UK is thought to live with a disability, but little is known about their access […]

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Top 10 most read in August: Caesarean sections and private medical insurance, seeking ambulance treatment for primary care problems, and social network interventions in type 2 diabetes

August sees eight new entries in the top 10 most read articles. Maintaining the top position for the second consecutive month is longitudinal cohort study by Xie et al, which examines the association between Proton Pump Inhibitors and the risk of all-cause mortality. At number two is a new entry from Vreman et al, who use a microsimulation model […]

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Improvised explosive devices inflict much more serious injuries than land mines

Multiple amputations much more likely   The types of close contact injuries inflicted by improvised explosive devices (IEDs) are much more serious than those associated with land mines, finds research published in the online journal BMJ Open.   Landmines came into widespread use in the Second World War, where they were designed to injure/maim rather […]

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Editors picks

BMJ Open: August Editor’s Picks     Each month the editorial team at BMJ Open will be selecting highlights from our recently published articles. We hope you enjoy our August highlights. You can access all the material published in August here.    When are interventions justified? Attitudes towards female genital cutting   Sometimes baseline data can […]

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Top 10 Most Read in July: Link Worker social prescribing, best practice in sex and relationship education, and menstrual hygiene management among Bangladeshi adolescent schoolgirls

  An assortment of study designs made it into the Top 10 Most Read articles in July: among the popular studies were a systematic review, a protocol for a prospective observational study, and a qualitative study of service user perceptions.   At number one this month is a longitudinal cohort study by Xie et al […]

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Top 10 Most Read in June: snus and snoring, long-term antibiotic treatment in times of resistance, the success of the NIHR Academic Clinical Fellowship, and serious video gaming for coping with pain

Six new articles made their way up to the Top 10 Most Read list of BMJ Open in June. Maintaining the top position for the second consecutive month is the systematic review and meta-analysis by Oliver Kennedy and colleagues establishing an association between coffee consumption and reduced risk of hepatocellular carcinoma, the most common type of liver cancer. […]

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