Can options make us worse off? Choice, pressure, and paid kidney donation

Guest Post: Julian J. Koplin Article: Choice, pressure and markets in kidneys Paying people to donate a ‘spare’ kidney might help alleviate the current shortage of transplantable organs. However, doing so would conflict with a principle widely accepted within the medical community since the earliest days of organ transplantation: that bodily organs should not be bought […]

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Organ Donation: Presumed Consent and Focusing on What Matters

Guest Post by Rebecca Brown Recent newspaper reports covered the story of Jemima Layzell, a 13 year old who died suddenly of a brain aneurysm in 2012. According to reports, shortly before Jemima died, the subject of organ donation had come up in discussions with her family, prompted by the death of a family friend […]

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Revealing Recipient Details to Families of Potential Organ Donors

Guest Post: David Shaw & Dale Gardiner Paper: Increasing organ donation rates by revealing recipient details to families of potential donors Families often don’t allow their deceased relatives to donate organs, even when the patient was a registered organ donor. Even when the donation process is explained sensitively by specialist nurses, families can focus much more […]

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Re: Nudges in a Post-truth World 

Guest Post: Nathan Hodson  In a recent article in the Journal of Medical Ethics, Neil Levy has developed a concept of “nudges to reason,” offering a new tool for those trying to reconcile medical ethics with the application of behavioural psychological research – a practice known as nudging. Very roughly, nudging means adjusting the way choices […]

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No Pain, All Gain: The Case for Farming Organs in Brainless Humans

Guest post by Ruth Stirton, University of Sussex (@RuthStirton) and David Lawrence, Newcastle University (@Biojammer) It is widely acknowledged that there is a nationwide shortage of organs for transplantation purposes.  In 2016, 400 people died whilst on the organ waiting list.  Asking for donors is not working fast enough.  We should explore all avenues to […]

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Personal Responsibility Within Health Policy: Unethical and Ineffective

Guest Post by Phoebe Friesen Re: Personal responsibility within health policy: unethical and ineffective If someone who has smoked two packs a day for thirty years and someone who has never smoked but is unfortunate enough to inherit a genetic condition are both in need of heart surgery, who should be given priority? Should an […]

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Intentionally Exposing Patients to HIV: When Might it be Ethical?

Guest Post by Bram Wispelwey, Ari Zivotofsky, and Alan Jotkowitz Much has been made of the fact that over the last two decades HIV has transformed from an inevitable, agonising killer into a controllable chronic disease.  But have we reached a point where infecting someone with HIV in order to avoid other, potentially worse health outcomes […]

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Give the gift of giving – donate someone elses organ or how the current online system for organ donation allows you to sign up others as long as you know a few details about them. Oops.

Hattip to Nathan Emmerich for speculating about this on Facebook and then blogging about it here: Organ Donation: Why isn’t there an App for that? There are a number of ways you can volunteer to donate your organs when you die in the UK, you can sign up when you get a drivers license, you […]

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