You don't need to be signed in to read BMJ Blogs, but you can register here to receive updates about other BMJ products and services via our site.

Minimising dance injury through changing dance floors

25 Jun, 15 | by Bridie Scott-Parker

As someone who has appreciated many dance performances (primarily as I have absolutely NO dancing ability or talent in any single speck of my body!), and as an injury prevention researcher and advocate, my interest was piqued by an article authored by Hopper, Alderson, Elliott, & Ackland recently published in the Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport. Having been made for martial arts instead of dancing, I can still recall as a teen the difference flooring can make when you ‘land hard’ – bouts on a tatami were much preferred to bouts in a gymnasium with wood floors (too hard) or with gymnastic mats (too soft). Shin splints already irritated by running hurdles and leaping triple jump were further aggravated by both types of floors. Similarly, Hopper and colleagues note that dance floors have the capacity to contribute to – or prevent – ankle injuries such as ankle tendinopathies and sprains. In their examination of ankle joint mechanics, 14 dancers performed drop landings on five different floors. They note that “Considering the large mechanical demand required to stabilize the ankle joint during landings, floor properties that can absorb landing energy have the potential to reduce ankle joint loads.” Given that nearly 30 years later my shin splints can be aggravated simply by playing a game of basketball with my husband and children (I have decided that it is not simply due to ageing!), it is important to prevent injury wherever possible. Minimising injury is the next best step, although I really don’t think I can blame my shin splints for my non-dancing career path. Thankfully my career does not depend on my lower legs!

More background on our blogging team

19 Jun, 15 | by Bridie Scott-Parker

Blog 3: So today I wanted to share some more background on our blogging team. As an applied social psychologist, I find this information very interesting indeed!

What excites you about being part of the Injury Prevention social media editorial team?  

Sheree Bekker: The invaluable conversation that has sprung up around scholarly work through the collaborative power of social media and blogs inspires me to no end. I tend to find more relevant scholarly content through Twitter than through traditional platforms, and Injury Prevention has played a big part in that. As researchers, I believe that we should own our voice on social media, and constructively add value to this conversation.

David Bui: Through my studies in medical school I have seen the costs of injuries to society and individuals worldwide.  This is a great opportunity to harness the underutilised power of Social Media in health promotion and Injury Prevention, across multiple disciplines and multiple borders.

Angy El-Khatib: Being a part of the Injury Prevention social media editorial team is a great opportunity personally and collectively. By being a part of the social media editorial team, I am able to stay up to date on various topics within the realm of Injury Prevention while acquiring different perspectives from individuals from different backgrounds, disciplines, and locations. I’m also excited to be able to potentially increase readership and engage readers to create a conversation around the latest Injury Prevention research and ideas.

Klara Johansson: I am very interested to explore ways to share and disseminate knowledge and research results, outside the “old-school”, regular channels. I look forward to learning from my new co-editors, who all seem to be great communicators.

Joseph Magoola: The opportunity to work and collaborate with a variety of scholars on the injury prevention platform is nothing short of exciting. It also excites and inspires me to have an opportunity to represent Africa since low and medium income countries bear the brunt of the injury burden.

Julian Santaella-Tenorio: It is really exciting to be part of this team and to have a space to communicate and express ideas on ways to improve injury prevention, and to discuss about new studies and topics relevant to this field. I am very motivated to learn more and continue growing as a researcher as I walk through this experience.

What are you passionate about?

Sheree Bekker: Intersectional issues drive my life’s work, and my aim is that my research is, and always will be, an extension of that.

David Bui: Passionate about bringing people and ideas together.

Angy El-Khatib: I am passionate about translating scientific evidence and research into public health action. My goal is to improve the health and wellbeing of myself as well as my community. Outside of my work, I am passionate about health, fitness, and wellness.

Klara Johansson: Open discussions and innovative research in collaborative teams with high scientific ambition + high levels of tolerance and kindness; I also enjoy making difficult subjects understandable to students and the general population. Passions on my free time: nature, gardening, books, movies, writing fiction, playing music (clarinet, harmonium, piano, accordion).

Joseph Magoola: Writing on my social media accounts (facebook, twitter and my blog) as a way of reaching out to the masses. I am also interested travelling a lot, especially by road and as such, ensuring road safety is part and parcel of my aims to contribute towards reducing the carnage of our roads.

Julian Santaella-Tenorio: I am passionate about things that can make people have a better, healthier and happier life. I am inspired by ideas challenging previous knowledge, creative thinking finding answers from different angles, and the power of multidisciplinary groups. That is why I am passionate about public health research.

 

I hope you are looking forward to hearing from our bloggers, starting next month!

More background on our new blogging team

18 Jun, 15 | by Bridie Scott-Parker

Today I will share more about our blogging team members.

Blog 2: Explain your injury prevention research and interests.

Sheree Bekker: My research investigates safety promotion and injury prevention policy and practice within community sport in Australia. I have a particular interest in dissemination and social marketing. The overall purpose of my research is to allow people to be safe, as well as feel safe, whilst participating in sport or physical activity.

David Bui: Undertaking a number of different projects currently; my injury prevention research focuses on Hip fracture and Falls Prevention research, working with Neuroscience Research Australia. I am also looking into Social Media and its utility in healthcare and civilian settings, and I believe that it represents a powerful new medium in health promotion and injury prevention.

Angy El-Khatib: I am interested in integrating public health approaches with athletic training practice. Athletic training has traditionally focused on the individual but may be able to maximize the effectiveness of prevention efforts by using population-level approaches to improve health and wellness.

Klara Johansson: I am not currently doing research on injury/safety. But I am interested in social difference in injury risk – and also how perceived risk of injuries affects people’s daily lives, mobility, fears and physical activity; and how perceived and real injury risks interrelate with each other and with gender and socioeconomics. Main focus on adolescent safety; real and perceived. Also interested in open data and availability/accessibility of injury statistics globally.

Joseph Magoola: My research interests center around prevention of injury, especially through generation of data for evidence-based decision making and policy action. I am also interested in the use of media to disseminate research findings and for advocacy.

Julian Santaella-Tenorio: At the moment I conduct research on policy evaluation, specifically on policies that impact injury-related outcomes. I am interested in looking at substance use policies and firearm-related legislation and their effects on the health of populations.

Tomorrow: Learn about their passions!

Very exciting news!

16 Jun, 15 | by Bridie Scott-Parker

Announcing the new Injury Prevention social media editorial team

Today I am both delighted and honoured as Senior Blog Editor to introduce our outstanding team of Injury Prevention Blog Editors. Over the coming days I will blog so that you can learn quite a bit about our Editors, including their experience and injury prevention interests. I am sure over time you will come to eagerly await their next blog and their latest tweet!

Blog 1:  Tell us about yourself and introduce your tweet

Sheree Bekker:   PhD scholar originally from South Africa, currently based at the Australian Centre for Research into Injury in Sport and its Prevention (ACRISP), Federation University Australia. My PhD research is on the development and dissemination of safety promotion and injury prevention resources for community sport in Australia. @shereebekker is based @ACRISPFedUni researching #dissemination #sportsafety & #injuryprevention. Student representative @_AIPN

David Bui: Final year B. Med / M.D. student at the University of New South Wales (UNSW), Sydney, Australia. Research interests in Injury prevention in a variety of settings, including Orthopaedics, Sports Medicine and Performing Arts Medicine, as well as Medical Education. Current President of UNSW Sports Medicine Society. @David_Bui_  is a final year BMed/MD student @UNSW. Passionate about #injuryprevention #Ortho, #Sportsmed #MusicMed #MedEd #FOAMed. President @UNSWSportMedsoc

Angy El-Khatib: Master of Public Health from West Virginia University. Background in Athletic Training from Marshall University. I am interested in intersecting public health approaches into athletic training practice to address injury prevention issues at the population level. @angyotensin is a MPH grad of @WVUPublicHealth. Alum of @MUSportsMed. Interested in intersecting #publichealth with #athletictraining.

Klara Johansson: Public health researcher from Sweden, with a PhD degree from Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, currently based at Umeå university, Sweden. @KlaJoh, is researcher at @UmeaUniversity (and consultant). Research on #adolescent #safety, #mental_health, #sexuality, #gender

Joseph Magoola: Masters of Public Health graduate, based at Makerere University School of Public Health, Kampala Uganda. I am currently coordinating a collaboration research study between Johns Hopkins University and Makerere University on saving lives in drowning, as well as writing a manuscript of my MPH dissertation research. #Injuryprevention @jmagoola is based @maksph and blogs about #injuries on https://josephmagoola.wordpress.com/author/josephmagoola/

Julian Santaella-Tenorio: Third year epidemiology doctoral student at Columbia University in New York. I am originally from Colombia, South America. My research interest focuses on injury and violence prevention, substance abuse and mental health. @Juliaosanta is a DrPH candidate at @cuepidemiology at @Columbia currently doing research on injury and violence prevention

Thank you to my team of Blog Editors for sharing with us, and I look forward to sharing more tomorrow.

 

Self-report versus observation

14 Jun, 15 | by Bridie Scott-Parker

For various reasons ranging from cost to a lack of alternatives, self-report is a common data collection method. However, anyone who has used a self-report data collection method would be well aware of the limitations of this method. Limitations primarily focus on the accuracy of responses, and can include such considerations as an intentional reporting bias (e.g., the participant wants to be seen in a positive light), and an unintentional reporting bias (e.g., the participant simply forgot that they had engaged in the targeted behaviour). I myself have used self-report methodology in a number of different research projects, therefore I am always interested in studies which investigate the validity of self-report measures by comparing the findings with other methodologies.

One recent study compared self-report findings with the findings from home-based observations: Osborne, Shibl, Cameron, Kendrick, Lyons, Spinks, Sipe, and McClure report that in some instances, the self-report responses were 100% in agreement with some of the observations held in the homes of 32 families, while in general the Authors concluded that self-report methodologies can confidently be used in instances where observation may not be feasible. The Authors note that knowing that a home visit would be occurring may have encouraged participants to more accurately report items in the self-administered survey; however, interestingly the Authors also noted that over-reporting of safe practice was demonstrated in approximately half of the items, while under-reporting occurred for one-third of items, suggesting that self-report biases are a complex phenomenon indeed.

Choosing a data collection method can require consideration of multiple factors including strengths and limitations associated with each approach, and validation studies can help us understand the potential magnitude of some of these strengths and limitations.

Friday 29 May in Australia is Fatality Free Friday

28 May, 15 | by Bridie Scott-Parker

Tomorrow, Friday 29 May, is Fatality Free Friday down under. As noted on the website,

Road safety is a complex issue but we believe that if drivers consciously think about road safety and safe driving for just one Friday in the year, that day’s toll – statistically about 5.3 deaths – could be reduced to zero.

That’s our aim. Not a single road death in Australia for just one day. Just one Fatality Free Friday.

We believe that if drivers are asked to actively concentrate on road safety and safe driving for just one day in the year, they’ll drive safer for the next few days too and, over time, change their outlook completely, consciously thinking about safety each and every day they get behind the wheel.

Various events have been underway throughout Australia this week, promoting Fatality Free Friday tomorrow. I am delighted to be coordinating the Fatality Free Friday event for the Sunshine Coast region at the University of the Sunshine Coast, and I look forward to welcoming road safety partners Transport and Main Roads, Queensland Police, the Sunshine Coast Council, Maurice Blackburn Lawyers, and Rotary, as we engage with our community so that we may all be safer on the roads.

Visitors will have the opportunity to take the pledge to be safer drivers, signing an inflatable car; learn firsthand vehicle features which can help prevent a crash, and protect you in the event of a crash, from vehicle inspectors; engage with police officers who will be attending with a police vehicle and a police motorbike; access a breadth of road safety resources; see and hear the wake of sadness which follows a crash from a display of thongs representing Sunshine Coast community members killed in road crashes over the past five years and from stories shared by the remaining family members; and learn about efforts being taken to improve young driver road safety in particular by community groups like Rotary and a researcher (me!).

I urge everyone, everywhere, to make every day a Fatality Free Friday for all road users.

Eyeglass injuries

18 May, 15 | by Bridie Scott-Parker

I had a delightful experience a couple of years ago, during which a young man (he looked all of 13 years old, but he did have a degree hanging on his office wall…….) told me that “now I have reached THAT age I need to wear glasses”. I don’t think he picked up on my death-glare, and thank goodness I don’t have lasers for eyes or he would have disappeared in a flash! FYI I will never reach THAT age, and I wanted to ring his mother and tell her that her son was very rude indeed! I had worn glasses for many years while working on my computer, but the unbearable headache meant that I would cave and wear a different set of glasses (yay, two prescriptions) all of the time. My teens both wear glasses all the time as they have done so for most of their lives, and, like them, they think it means that I am now blind without them. I catch them out doing all sorts of shenanigans when my glasses are off and they think they are safe: to their disappointment I have explained that I can see perfectly well without my glasses, I just have a horribly persistent headache if I don’t wear them all the time. The good news is that they do cover the bags under my eyes, so it’s not all bad : )

So, that is a long-winded background to an interesting review article I came across the other day, and it struck a chord with me as a glasses-wearer. Hoskin, Philip, Dain and Mackey conducted a review of the ocular trauma associated with wearing glasses, identifying a range of risk factors such as playing sports whilst wearing glasses. Their article published this month in the Clinical and Experimental Optometry Journal was an interesting read for me, particularly as I have found my glasses have protected me from injury.

Some background is probably needed here also…. I am known as an injury-prone person, and my eyes have proven just as vulnerable as the rest of my body. For example, I remember many a tumble on the trampoline as a child, and me crying inwardly (I had to show off in front of my brothers) that my knee always managed to find – and smash –  my eye socket. Fast forward to the days of endless-nappy-washing, and I am yet to meet another person who had a gum leaf slice the surface of their eye open while they were pegging the washing on the clothesline. Eye drops, impersonating a pirate for a couple of days, and a great excuse for not pegging out the washing any time soon. I am also pretty sure that eye-slashing gum leaves are not in any tourist brochures! My glasses have been protective, as they may have been that gusty day, such as preventing my whippet from giving me a black eye with the top of his head as he galloped around our acreage (I did end up with a glasses-shaped bruise around my eye and on my nose, however), and many a branch has scraped against the outside of the lens (better there than in my eye!). I have also had to scrape paint off their outer edge, suggesting I am not very talented with a roller. Having said that, I did have to be treated for an eye infection earlier this year after the sprinkler on our recycled water hose burst, sending a shower of recycled water (code: yucky water from our dishwasher, showers, and sinks) all over me, including the inside surface of my glasses and INSIDE my eye. Short of wearing goggles, though, I don’t think glasses would have helped prevent this latest injury.

Can anyone beat my gum-leaf eye injury?

 

 

Are cost of injury studies cost-effective?

13 May, 15 | by Barry Pless

This appeared in my email so I am sharing it with blog readers but I do have a comment to add. I cannot help but wonder why we still think that publicizing cost of injury studies, or, indeed doing them, is likely to help prevent injuries in the long run. All injury prevention professionals are well aware of how much could be saved even if we only applied what we already know. It is even likely, almost certain, that most policy makers including those directly involved in health care at each local, state or provincial, and federal level, also know that injuries are extremely costly and that their prevention is a good investment. Yet, every since such studies have been popular, I see little substantial change in the resources policy makers are providing for prevention. So, I have to wonder. Perhaps some readers will see things differently. I especially invite the leading experts listed below to respond to this question.  Or, perhaps even more germane, perhaps someone from the Economic Club of Canada, will share their reactions on this blog and tell us, what specifically, they intend to do in response to what they have learned. 

“Parachute is revealing a new report The Cost of Injury In Canada at the Economic Club of Canada on June 3, 2015. Through the perspectives of leading experts — including Louis Thériault, Vice-President, Public Policy for the Conference Board of Canada, Dr. Louis Francescutti, immediate past President, Canadian Medical Association, and Dr. Ian Pike, Director of BC Research and Prevention Unit — this discussion panel will explore the societal burdens and cost pressures of preventable injuries. The panel will be moderated by Louise Logan, Parachute President & CEO. Leading Canadian franchise expert and lawyer, Ned Levitt, joins the panel to inform and inspire all with his daughter Stacey’s story, who died suddenly at age 18.”

Another colleague honoured: Gary Slutkin, Illinois Order of Lincoln

21 Apr, 15 | by Barry Pless

I found this posted somewhere online and wanted to share the good news with our readers.

“Gary Slutkin, M.D., Founder & Executive Director of Cure Violence, will be honored for his work as 2015 Recipient of the Illinois Order of Lincoln, the state’s highest honor for professional achievement and public service. The Order of Lincoln will be presented at the 51st Convocation of the Lincoln Academy of Illinois in the chambers of the Illinois House of Representatives in Springfield on Saturday, May 9, 2015. A gala reception and dinner in honor of the 2015 recipients will be held at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum in Springfield.

“This year’s recipients of the Order of Lincoln have helped make Illinois and the world a better place,” Governor Rauner said. “The work they have accomplished is admirable, and it is our privilege to honor them. Mr. Lincoln would be proud.”

 

Bridie Scott-Parker promoted

15 Apr, 15 | by Barry Pless

Not only has our very own Bridie Scott-Parker received a new title with respect to this blog, but Linkedin informs us that she has also been promoted and is now Leader at Adolescent Risk Research Unit (ARRU. I believe this is part of the Transportation Research Board but if I am mistaken I trust she will post a correction. Either way, congratulations to Bridie, whose posts to the blog are always worth reading. 

Injury Prevention blog

Injury Prevention

News, notes and discussion of topics relevant to injury prevention science and practice. Visit Site



Creative Comms logo

Latest from Injury Prevention

Latest from Injury Prevention