Take Action for Injury Prevention 2017

In his closing remarks to the 2016 World Safety conference, Professor Adnan Hyder encouraged delegates to “take action.” These words also weave through the Tampere Declaration which encourages a global commitment for stronger injury and violence prevention by integrating injury and violence prevention into other health and safety advocacy platforms. The Australian Injury Prevention Network […]

Read More…

Pondering the peanutabout…..

I read the StreetsBlogUSA post Study: Diagonal Intersections are Especially Dangerous for Cyclists today with great interest, for a number of reasons that I thought I would share with you. Firstly, there is no doubt that cyclists are a vulnerable road user group, and that particular segments of road are more problematic for cyclists. The research cited […]

Read More…

Meet Graham and Almost Impossible Cancer Spaghetti: The intersection between injury prevention and the arts

“The artist is distinguished from all other responsible actors in society — the politicians, legislators, educators, and scientists — by the fact that he is his own test tube, his own laboratory, working according to very rigorous rules, however unstated these may be, and cannot allow any consideration to supersede his responsibility to reveal all […]

Read More…

Safe Travels – or Tampere and back again (and everything in between)

[SB] Our guest blogger is Russ Milner – reporting on his experiences at the recent Safety conference (follow him on Twitter @RussMilner) [RM] I was fortunate enough to win the inaugural Australian Injury Prevention Network (AIPN) Travel Subsidy to support my attendance at Safety 2016, the 12th World Conference on Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion in […]

Read More…

The Lancet Series on Urban Design, Transport and Health: cities planned for humans rather than cars

“Worldwide, the majority of people already live in cities and by 2050, it is estimated that 75% of 10 billion people have cities as an important social determinant of health. Air pollution, physical inactivity, noise, social isolation, unhealthy diets, and exposure to crime play a very important part in the non-communicable disease burden. This 3-part […]

Read More…

Quantifying the burden of injury in ‘data-poor’ setting; a local-need- driven approach?

…global estimation efforts have produced country-specific estimates, stimulated country data hunts that fed data into their machinery and, in a few ‘data-rich’ countries, facilitated full burden of disease and injury assessments too. However, to date, injury burden estimates for the vast majority of ‘data-poor’ countries come from indirect estimation in these global projects. […]

Read More…

Guest Blog: ‘Breaking Down Walls – Taking Translation and Dissemination to the Next Level’

  Often, when people think of translational research, it is through the lens of Grand Rounds, seminars, and conference presentations. It is usually clinical in nature and comes directly from the researcher. There is another type of translational research – NIH calls it Type 2 translation. I am part of a Type 2 translational research team at a […]

Read More…

Life post-injury, aka preventing further injury

While we as injury-prevention professionals, practitioners and policy-makers work tirelessly to prevent injury, the reality is – never more evident than at the Safety 2016 conference underway as I type in Tampere, Finland – that “Beyond deaths tens of millions of people suffer injuries that lead to hospitalization, emergency department visits, and treatment by general […]

Read More…

How to cut violence painlessly: Increase alcohol taxes

[SB] This post is by Nicholas Page and Jonathan Shepherd. Nicholas Page is a Senior Research Assistant at the Wales Institute of Social and Economic Research, Data and Methods (WISERD) and former Research Associate at Cardiff University’s Violence Research Group. Follow Nick on Twitter @Nick_Alan_Page Jonathan Shepherd is a Professor of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Director of […]

Read More…

Celebrating science and inspiring the next generation of scientists

Last week in Australia was National Science Week, a nation-wide celebration of science and technology via three key pathways. Pathway one is to inspire the general public to be involved in science – creating new knowledge – through engaging activities such as Citizen Science. This year’s Citizen Scientists are identifying Australian wildlife that are featured […]

Read More…