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Students

George Gillett: The NHS and immigration

1 Sep, 15 | by BMJ

george_gillettLast February, the UK Home Office announced changes to immigration rules that would mean non-EU nurses would not have their visa applications prioritised. The decision not to add nursing to the list of “shortage occupations” reflects the government’s belief that nursing posts can be filled without international recruitment, but has received criticism from the Royal College of Nursing and a number of NHS managers. Clinical directors went as far as branding the move a “complete disaster,” while NHS Employers wrote to the Home Office to protest their decision earlier this month. more…

Sioned Gwyn on sexism and women in medicine

17 Jun, 15 | by BMJ

sioned_gwynSir Tim Hunt, British biochemist and Nobel Laureate, had until recently enjoyed relative anonymity outside of scientific fields. Recently, at an international conference of science journalists in Seoul, he was invited to speak at a meeting for women in science and delivered as part of his speech an extraordinarily ill judged few sentences which have come to haunt him: “Let me tell you about my trouble with girls. Three things happen when they are in the lab. You fall in love with them, they fall in love with you, and when you criticise them, they cry.

more…

Salil Patel: Why you should know about global surgery

12 Jun, 15 | by BMJ

salil_patel2More people die from a lack of surgical care than from HIV, malaria, and tuberculosis combined. Half of the world’s population face catastrophic financial expenditure due to surgery. With over 90% of people in most low and middle income countries lacking affordable, surgical care, medical students around the world are helping work towards resolving this injustice.

The last time you donated to a medical charity, it probably had no relation to surgery whatsoever. Why should it? To many, surgery is still a luxurious medical intervention reserved for high income countries. Paul Farmer, of Harvard’s School of Public Health, famously described surgery as the “neglected stepchild of global health.” more…

Neel Sharma: We need to improve feedback to medical students

11 Jun, 15 | by BMJ

The other day I made a point of observing the number of people walking whilst using their mobile phones. I am sure we have all made a similar observation of people staring down at their phones. The vast extent of the problem has even been characterised clinically as “text neck.” I recall the days of my teens when mobile phones either didn’t exist or were a luxury. I was allowed to use my parents’ mobile on a Saturday evening when meeting friends to watch a film or go for dinner. And now it seems that if we don’t exchange instant messages with each other or send several Emojis’ a day we are out of touch more…

Neel Sharma: Validation in medical education—from classroom to curriculum

1 Jun, 15 | by BMJ

In clinical research there is typically a transition from cell based analysis, animal work, and human involvement before any form of intervention, be it diagnostic or treatment based, is deemed valid in a clinical setting. One example I can relate to currently is the use of image enhanced endoscopy which my colleagues and I are working on at the human stage having cleared cellular and animal works.

The FDA is central to the drug and device approval process. And interestingly for the former, up to 3000 patients can be tested with the process taking several years. The latter also follows similar cautious settings. more…

Neel Sharma: Reforms in medical education—are we missing something?

22 May, 15 | by BMJ

Medical education has seen significant change over the past decade and more. Advances in teaching, learning, and assessment strategies are vast. The didactic lecture form of teaching is no longer the flavour of the month it seems with more and more emphasis on problem and team based learning. Classrooms are seeing the use of mobile devices to allow for rapid learner access to information and instructors are now tasked with the need not to simply disseminate information but to ensure understanding and provide appropriate feedback. Classes are being “flipped” and the MOOC movement has meant that attending face to face teaching is slowly becoming a non-existing entity. more…

Daniel Barrett: Will a seven day NHS push primary care recruitment from crisis to catastrophe?

20 May, 15 | by BMJ

I listened with personal interest as the new conservative government re-launched its grand plan to deliver a “seven day health service.” In a little over a year I will be beginning life as a junior doctor along with thousands of others, all starting to question where our careers are heading. The answer for many of us could well be tied up inextricably with the fate of the “seven day NHS.” more…

Neel Sharma: Getting the right medical students comes with time

13 May, 15 | by BMJ

Last month, Richard Schwartzstein authored his perspective on poor communication skills among medical students and beyond (1). I read this with great interest and wanted to share my insights as a doctor in training. In the UK, it was also noted that allegations about doctors’ communication skills had risen by 69 per cent in the last year and complaints about lack of respect by 45 per cent (2). Whilst we may attempt to screen out those poor communicators early on as Richard highlights, I am not sure if this is truly beneficial. more…

Marika Davies: Medical students and social media

30 Apr, 15 | by BMJ

marika_daviesAnyone who has taught medical students in recent years will be familiar with the sight of students appearing more interested in the screens of their laptops, tablets, or mobile phones. While they may, of course, be using their devices to take notes, there is always the suspicion that they are in fact sending text messages or improving their Candy Crush score.

But the educational opportunities that digital technologies also provide are developing fast. This year’s Institute of Medical Ethics conference “Ethics in a digital age” identified that teachers are often left catching up with medical students who have grown up as digital natives. more…

Sanna W Khawaja: At a crossroads in medical training

17 Mar, 15 | by BMJ

sanna_khawajaI am in the recruitment stage between interviews and offers. At this moment in time, when I look to August I can see myself as both in training and not in training. I can see myself as employed and as unemployed. Perhaps it is the task of ranking potential future jobs, or the desire to avoid this task, that has me thinking very seriously about my future as a doctor in the NHS.

When I took a year out after foundation training, it had been for a number of reasons. Yes, part of it was the desire to gain more experience, to travel, to work abroad, and to finally pick a specialty to commit to. But perhaps, more importantly, it was a chance to step off of the conveyor belt of medical training and re-examine my choices so far. more…

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