New resource aims to advance measurement in palliative care

Patients are set to benefit from the new Palliative Care Outcome Scale (POS), a tool developed to assist clinicians, researchers and other healthcare workers in measuring physical symptoms; psychological, emotional and spiritual needs; and provision of information and support at the end of life. Developed by Professor Irene J Higginson, POS is a free resource […]

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News and updates from palliativedrugs.com

Selected items from the News and Latest Additions sections of www.palliativedrugs.com, the world’s leading palliative care website. Safety Updates McKinley T34 extension sets: UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) issue recall All T34 syringe pump extension sets manufactured by CME (McKinley Medical UK) before 1 January 2011 have been recalled due to the […]

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SHORT CUTS

Articles of interest in other scholarly journals Click on the article headings to view the abstracts A comprehensive review of opioid-induced hyperalgesia Lee M, Silverman SM, Hansen H, Patel VB, Manchikanti L. Pain Physician 2011; 14:145-161 In this review of opioid-induced hyperalgesia, it is suggested that this phenomenon may result from neuroplastic changes in the […]

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Integrating quantitative and qualitative methods – and getting it published

Bill Noble, BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care, Editor-in-Chief Describing a study as ‘mixed method’ never felt very respectable or clever. For years we understood that finding the answer to questions about the value of parts of the health service required different kinds of data. The difficulty was knowing how best to put our findings together. […]

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Should the law on assisted dying be changed?

The BMJ shines a spotlight on the assisted dying debate, with a ‘Head to Head’ article authored by Raymond Tallis, former professor of geriatric medicine (University of Manchester) and Kevin Fitzpatrick, researcher for UK campaign Not Dead Yet (7 May, 2011). Tallis argues that allowing terminally ill people to choose an assisted death is part […]

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Bill Noble: Give Me a Doctor for Lansley’s NHS

I first remember hearing Auden’s poem during an after-dinner speech by one of the founding fathers of the hospice movement, Eric Wilkes. It describes the poet’s preference for a doctor, whose portly habitus betrays his understanding of patients’ weaknesses (1). The ideal physician is gentle in his approach, calm in adversity and explicit in his […]

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