Top ten most read in November: management of musculoskeletal conditions by physical therapists, inequalities in the rise in infant mortality in England, and the cost and environmental impact of switching to low global warming potential inhalers

The list of the top ten most read articles in November sees many previous entries keeping their places, including a case-control study on antidepressant use during pregnancy and the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus. However, November has also welcomed three new entries into the top ten.

New in at number one is a systematic review by Zadro et al., whose study aim was to determine what percentage of treatment choices recommended by physical therapists for musculoskeletal conditions are in line with management recommendations in evidence-based guidelines and systematic reviews. They found that many physical therapists appear not to follow evidence-based guidelines when managing musculoskeletal conditions.

Following closely at number two is a recent time trend analysis by Taylor-Robinson et al. Here, the authors investigated whether there were inequalities in the sustained rise in infant mortality in England in recent years, and the contribution of rising child poverty to these trends. Their findings suggested that the poorest areas of the country were disproportionately affected by the rise in infant mortality, whereas the more affluent areas were unaffected. Their analysis also found a link between the recent increase in infant mortality in England with rising child poverty, which suggests that roughly a third of the increase in infant mortality between 2014 to 2017 may be linked to the rise in child poverty.

Another new entry to the top ten is a study by Wilkinson et al., which predicts the economic cost and environmental impact of switching to low global warming potential inhalers in England. The authors investigated National Health Service prescription data in 2017 and collated carbon footprint data on inhalers commonly used in England. They found that switching from metered-dose inhalers to dry powder inhalers may result in large carbon savings, and can be achieved alongside reduced drug costs by using less expensive brands.

Rank Author(s) Title
1 Zadro et al. Do physical therapists follow evidence-based guidelines when managing musculoskeletal conditions? Systematic review
2 Taylor-Robinson et al. Assessing the impact of rising child poverty on the unprecedented rise in infant mortality in England, 2000-2017: time trend analysis
3 Stiglic and Viner Effects of screentime on the health and well-being of children and adolescents: a systematic review of reviews
4 Dandjinou et al. Antidepressant use during pregnancy and the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus: a nested case–control study
5 Wilkinson et al.
6 Kaasbøll and Paulsen What is known about the LGBTQ perspective in child welfare services? A scoping review protocol
7 Kapoor et al.
8 Kuh et al. Developmental factors associated with decline in grip strength from midlife to old age: a British birth cohort study
9 Du Mont et al.
10 Ellul et al. Metabolomics: population epidemiology and concordance in Australian children aged 11-12 years and their parents

 

Most read figures are based on pdf downloads and full text views. Abstract views are excluded.

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