Cut once, measure twice

As every child health practitioner knows, children’s telly is awash with moral learnings, repetitive messages and ear-worms. It can be a superb tool for the education and distraction of poorly children, and irritating barrier to bedtimes and homework, and a torture-device … try humming “Baby Shark” when you next go for your team coffee/drink and […]

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Refreshing

Every now and then you’ll hit an EBM question, clinical dilemma or situation where you’ve got it at the back of your mind, or the tip of your tongue, you’ve seen something similar before. It may be a network meta-analysis, where people seem to have combined studies in a spidergram not a forest plot. A […]

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Underrepresentation

Not uncommonly, the issue of the generalisability or representativeness of a study population to the ‘real world’ is raised. There are some pretty big issues here, not least the idea that studies are undertaken in an unreal world, where troubles melt like chimney tops and sail above your lemon drops. Avoiding those sorts of mangled […]

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Endocrinology is fun!

We hope that since the takeover of the @ADC_BMJ and @ArchivesEandP accounts by our social media team, you’ve enjoyed (and learnt something from) the flurry of thematic tweeting occurring each week as much as we have had generating them. The last week @ADC_BMJ has been focussed on the subspecialty of paediatric endocrinology and diabetes, and […]

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Confounded

There’s a lot of confusion on confounding. We need to understand confounding when we try to use non-randomised studies to see if doing a Thing is going to produce more good than harm, or looking for risk factors we then will hope to influence to produce goodness. If we look at observational data on time-to-diagnosis […]

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Guest Blog: 5 Tips Parents/Caregivers Can Use to Help Make Cancer Less Painful for Kids: #KidsCancerPain

Pain is one of the most distressing symptoms children living with cancer experience. It can be caused by the disease, procedures and side effects of medication. Pain can be pervasive and impact every part of a child with cancer’s life. Managing this pain has been shown to have a profound impact on a child’s health […]

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Using the power of pathology

Back in the mists of pre-clinical training, I used to believe that disease states arose through disordered bodies. That illness was a disturbance of anatomy and physiology, and that by understanding the basics of normal, we could derive the pathological, and so predict the disorder and define the therapy. Then I learned of the influence […]

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