From evidence to policy and practice

Regular readers of the Injury Prevention blog will be quite familiar with my obsession for getting our rigorous research translated into policy and practice. I regularly hear from individuals in industry and government, not to mention the general community, that researchers are great at communicating with other researchers, and not so great at communicating with ‘normal people’. Upon hearing this […]

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Recalls on the radar

Over the past few months I have noticed an abundance of recalls for various products, including mass recalls after ignition switch defects in General Motors cars. As noted on their website (http://www.gmignitionupdate.com/faq.html), “There is a risk, under certain conditions, that your ignition switch may move out of the “run” position, resulting in a partial loss of […]

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Proactive rather than ‘The Hindenburg’ response

I had a conversation recently with a colleague who is a tireless worker in the safety of pedestrians, and his comment regarding policy response resonated with me so much that I thought I would share it with you. He likened policy response to road safety to the Hindenburg Disaster of 1937 (see www.airships.net/hindenburge/disaster for more […]

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Kids and Guns

A recent article in the New York Times captures several elusive aspects of gun violence prevention efforts and the “gun culture” that exists in some places in the United States. The article, Titled “Children and Guns: the Hidden Toll” focuses on the most tragic of unintentional gun related fatalities; those that involve children shooting themselves […]

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Experts concerned over the car safety features in Brazil

Rafael Consunji shared an interesting news feature on passenger car safety standards in Brazil written by Bradley Brooks of the Associated Press (Link: http://news.yahoo.com/ap-impact-cars-made-brazil-deadly-180411170.html).   Brooks in his feature, based on experts’ opinions, indicates that passenger cars made by the international automakers in Brazil lack standard safety features, which they usually provide in the cars […]

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High-income is not necessarily associated with better road safety performance in the Eastern Mediterranean Region

There is an interesting relationship between national income and road safety that becomes apparent when going through the second global status report on road safety (GSRRS). Numerous studies have shown that the wealth of a country is one of the major determinants of road fatality risk. One study by Koptis and Cropper (2005) showed that, […]

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The Challenge of Highlighting Violence against Women in Tradition-Adhering Societies

This week, Flaura Winston of the University of Pennsylvania shared the news post of the first ever media campaign regarding violence against women in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). The campaign features a veiled woman with a bruised and blackened eye, and is entitled “Some things can’t be covered.” The campaign is sponsored by […]

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Global Progress towards Comprehensive Legislation for Road Safety

On March 14th, 2013, the World Health Organization (WHO) released the second Global Status Report on Road Safety* (GSRRS-2013). Overall, the GSRRS-2013 concludes that “the number of road traffic deaths each year has not increased (from 2007 to 2011) – but remains unacceptably high at 1.24 million per year.” The GSRRS-2013 also noted the global […]

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