Connecting, coordination and coverage is crucial: my experiences with Fatality Free Friday

Dr Bridie Scott-Parker (University of the Sunshine Coast Accident Research), Councillor Rick Baberowski, Ms Megan Cawkwell (Sunshine Coast Council) [Photo courtesy Ms Vanessa Clarke]
Dr Bridie Scott-Parker (University of the Sunshine Coast Accident Research), Councillor Rick Baberowski, Ms Megan Cawkwell (Sunshine Coast Council) [Photo courtesy Ms Vanessa Clarke]

Last Friday, May 28, was Fatality Free Friday (see http://www.fatalityfreefriday.com/)  here in Australia. The aim of the event is Not a single road death in Australia for just one day. Just one Fatality Free Friday.

The Fatality Free Friday website states:

We believe that if drivers are asked to actively concentrate on road safety and safe driving for just one day in the year, they’ll drive safer for the next few days too and, over time, change their outlook completely, consciously thinking about safety each and every day they get behind the wheel.

Whilst as an evidence-based practitioner and methodologically-rigorous researcher I realise that this is not necessarily the most effective manner in which to prevent injury on the road, I was delighted to participate in my the Fatality Free Friday events of my local region for the three reasons listed in the title:

1. Connecting: Injury prevention professionals need to connect – simply espousing what the evidence suggests should be done is not enough. At a fundamental level we humans are social beings, and making the connection (the fifth ‘E’ of engagement) is often the key to making any inroads in injury prevention. We need to connect with policy-makers, we need to connect with those whom we are trying to protect, and we need to connect with our colleagues-in-arms. Connecting can be as simple as speaking to one person about how they can prevent injury (for example, at the local event), translating what the research means in real words for real people (such as in my University lecture later that morning), and giving tips regarding how to stay safe to those who may not be sure what to do (like during drive-time radio).

2. Coordination: The event was organised by Sunshine Coast Council, and attending stakeholders included Transport and Main Roads, Queensland Police, Maurice Blackburn lawyers, Coastwide Driving School, motorcycle champion Chris Vermeulen, and parents and friends of those lost to road crashes in addition to myself. We all play a part in road safety, so it is important we are coordinated in our efforts whenever we can have the opportunity.

3. Coverage: I can conduct all the research I want; however if I can’t translate this into practice through connecting, coordinating and coverage, how is this going to advance the world of injury prevention? We need our research translated into the real world, and coverage is essential.

How can you be active in injury prevention?

 

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