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Georg Röggla

The BMJ Today: Mediterranean diets and infant mortality

3 Dec, 14 | by BMJ Group

georg_rogglaThe Nurses ’Health Studies are long term epidemiological studies conducted on women’s health. They are among the largest investigations into risk factors for major chronic diseases in women ever conducted. Marta Crous-Bou and co-workers have published a new and interesting finding from it. Greater adherence to Mediterranean diet was significantly associated with longer leukocyte telomere length, a marker of biological aging. These results further support the health benefits of adherence to Mediterranean diet.

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The BMJ Today: Management of COPD

23 Sep, 14 | by BMJ

georg_roegglaChronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common diseases a GP has to manage in their daily routine. The BMJ has recently set a focus on COPD management.

Shawn D Aaron draws attention to the fact that patients with COPD are prone to acute respiratory exacerbations, with a possible detrimental effect on patients’ health status, in a state of the art review. Initial treatment is unsuccessful in about a quarter off all patients. The author addresses the benefits and many limitations of established COPD therapies. more…

The BMJ Today: Tranexamic acid and inferring significance of treatment effects

19 Aug, 14 | by BMJ

georg_roegglaTranexamic acid is a synthetic analog of the amino acid lysine. It is used to treat or prevent excessive blood loss during surgery and in various other medical conditions. An older analogue, epsilon aminocaproic acid, was temporarily withdrawn worldwide in 2007 after studies suggested that its use increased the risk of complications or death. Tranexamic acid, on the contrary, is considered to be a very promising drug. It is inexpensive and has been included in the WHO list of essential medicines.

Jashvant Poeran and colleagues have evaluated the effectiveness and safety of perioperative tranexamic acid use in patients undergoing total hip or knee arthroplasty in the United States in a large retrospective cohort study, which includes 872 416 patients. They report that tranexamic acid was effective in reducing the need for blood transfusions, while not increasing the risk of complications, including thromboembolic events and renal failure. more…

The BMJ Today: Explaining telomeres

15 Jul, 14 | by BMJ

georg_roegglaTelomeres are getting a lot of attention at the moment. At the 64th Nobel laureate meeting in Lindau two weeks ago, Elizabeth Blackburn (who won the 2009 Nobel prize in medicine) drew my attention to the role of telomeres in the cellular aging process. more…

Georg Roeggla: Nobel laureates meet young scientists

10 Jul, 14 | by BMJ

georg_roegglaThe 64th meeting of Nobel laureates in the field of medicine and physiology ended on 4 July, 2014. Thirty seven Nobel laureates and more than 600 selected young scientists from 80 countries participated in this week in Lindau, Bavaria. The objective of this meeting was to bring Nobel laureates and young researchers together to exchange ideas. Therefore, the main focus was the discussions of the Nobel laureates with the assembled young scientists, and embedded into this were a variety of speeches on hot topics in international research. more…

Georg Röggla: Intensive care and emergency medicine in Brussels

17 Mar, 10 | by julietwalker

Georg RögglaMore than 5000 participants from about 90 countries all around the world took part at the 30th International Symposium on Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine in Brussels, Belgium from March 9th to March 12th, 2010.  The declared goal of this meeting was to celebrate 30 years of intensive care and emergency medicine and hopefully help plan the next 30 years. more…

Georg Röggla on a new and different perspective of dying

1 Mar, 10 | by BMJ

Georg RögglaI have seen many people die in the nearly three decades I have worked as a clinician. I was, however, confronted with a totally different perspective of dying while attending a symposium “noch mal leben/vivere ancora [to live again]”  on palliative care at the free university of Bozen/Bolzano in South Tyrol in Italy on February 29th, 2010. more…

Georg Röggla: on the new European Research Council president

25 Feb, 10 | by julietwalker

Georg RögglaThe European Research Council (ERC) unanimously elected Prof. Helga Nowotny, an eminent social scientist, as the new ERC President on February 19th, 2010. Helga Nowotny is currently the ERC’s vice-President. She is Professor emeritus of Social Studies of Science, ETH Zurich, and Chair of the Scientific Advisory Board of Vienna University. She is also a former research fellow of King’s College in Cambridge. She will take office on March 1st, 2010. more…

Georg Röggla: Peter Sawicki’s dismissal

23 Feb, 10 | by julietwalker

Georg RögglaNutrition in Critical Care Medicine was the main topic in the lectures at the ‘Wiener Intensivmedizinische Tage’ in Vienna (February 10th to 13th, 2010), one of the biggest ICU meetings in the German speaking part of Europe.  In the corridors the most discussed topic was Peter Sawicki’s dismissal as head of the German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

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Georg Röggla on avalanches

9 Feb, 10 | by julietwalker

Georg RögglaThe avalanche danger level was the second highest possible this week in most parts of the Alps. But the warning did not help: six alpinists died in avalanches within 24 hours in Austria. Although the scientific knowledge about the pathophysiology of being buried under an avalanche has improved, and the number of hospitals with technical equipment allowing resuscitation of deep hypothermic avalanche victims without spontaneous circulation have grown, the number of people who die in avalanches is not declining. Wolfgang Ladenbauer from the Austrian Mountain Rescue Organisation told me that the reason is the absolute number of ski mountaineers has increased considerably. Also, the efforts to teach alpinists about alpine dangers and better equipment may have lead to a decrease of fear rather than an increase of knowledge in alpinists. So therefore the number of casualties has not declined.

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