StatsMiniBlog: Propensity scores

Propensity scores are used mainly in observational studies assessing treatments as a way of balancing out measured variations in who received a treatment and who didn’t. In most observational studies, there are things which will have pushed the doc into prescribing the medicine in question, or the surgeon to take the knife to that patient […]

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StatsMiniBlog. Regression

Now, regression is a bad thing if we’re talking development. It might be any number of really difficult to pronounce neurological conditions, or severe psychological trauma, or abuse/neglect. It’s not going to be good. In statistics, it’s not quite the same. Regression is quite often a good thing. But what is it? […]

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StatsMiniBlog: Exact vs. approximate

You may well come across descriptions in the stats parts of papers that describe how the authors have derived their confidence intervals using an exact method. Sounds very good, doesn’t it? Precise to the most precicestness. And yet … sometimes an approximate confidence interval is better. You see, it all means what ‘exact’ exactly refers […]

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StatsMiniBlog: Odds and Probabilities

There’s something that is frequently wittered about but the odds are you’ve never really been bothered enough to care if there’s a difference between ‘probability’ and ‘odds’ (like relative risk and odds ratios). There are great reasons for this. Coffee, beer, ‘Take Me Out’ or a crash call to labour ward are four, for example. […]

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