Top ten most read in January: screentime and child and adolescent health, experiences and perceptions of female surgeons, and the impact of Brexit on fruit and vegetable intake and cardiovascular disease in England

The list of the ten most-read articles in January at BMJ Open sees four new entries. Taking over the top spot is a study by Neza Stiglic and Russell Viner who have published a systematic review of reviews investigating the association between screentime and the health and well-being of children and adolescents. Some evidence was shown for harmful effects of screentime in this population, including increased adiposity, unhealthy diet, depressive symptoms, and quality of life.

In at number three is a study by Bellini et al. investigating the experiences of women working in surgery in Great Britain and Ireland. A majority (88%) of women who took part in the survey perceive surgery as a male-dominated field, and over half (59%) had experienced discrimination.

New in at number six is a timely study by Seferidi et al. looking into the potential impacts of Brexit on fruit and vegetable intake and cardiovascular disease in England using economic and epidemiological modelling methods. The price of fruit and vegetables was shown to increase under all Brexit scenarios, leading to a reduction in intake of between 2.5% and 11.4%. The authors also modelled the possible impact on cardiovascular deaths, with a no-deal Brexit scenario being the most harmful.

Finally, at number seven is a study investigating the implications of the introduction of new criteria for the diagnosis of gestational diabetes in Australia. After the introduction of the new criteria, the annual incidence of gestational diabetes increased by 73.7% as did the overall cost of care for the disease, with little change in immediate clinical outcomes.

Rank Author(s) Title
1 Stiglic and Viner Effects of screentime on the health and well-being of children and adolescents: a systematic review of reviews
2 Khaw et al. Randomised trial of coconut oil, olive oil or butter on blood lipids and other cardiovascular risk factors in healthy men and women
3 Bellini et al. A woman’s place is in theatre: women’s perceptions and experiences of working in surgery from the Association of Surgeons of Great Britain and Ireland women in surgery working group
4 Müller et al. Impact of the communication and patient hand-off tool SBAR on patient safety: a systematic review
5 Mehta et al. Short-term abstinence from alcohol and changes in cardiovascular risk factors, liver function tests and cancer-related growth factors: a prospective observational study
6 Seferidi et al.  Impacts of Brexit on fruit and vegetable intake and cardiovascular disease in England: a modelling study
7 Cade et al. Implications of the introduction of new criteria for the diagnosis of gestational diabetes: a health outcome and cost of care analysis
8 Petrilli et al. Understanding patient preference for physician attire: a cross-sectional observational study of 10 academic medical centres in the USA
9 Zinn et al. Assessing the nutrient intake of a low-carbohydrate, high-fat (LCHF) diet: a hypothetical case study design
10 Pereira Gray et al. Continuity of care with doctors—a matter of life and death? A systematic review of continuity of care and mortality

 

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