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World Cancer Day

4 Feb, 16 | by Gary Mitchell, Associate Editor

Today we are delighted to bring you 2 special guest blogs for World Cancer Day.  The first blog, from Kristen Maloney, discusses the art of cancer nursing while our second blog, from Professor Sarah Kagan, discusses cancer nursing and older people.

Click Here to Read Our Two Special Blogs for World Cancer Day!

Mental Health Diagnosis – Friend or Foe?

31 Jan, 16 | by atwycross

This week’s EBN Twitter Chat on Wednesday 3rd February between 8-9 pm (UK time) will focus on whether mental health diagnosis are a friend or a foe. The Twitter Chat will be hosted by Neil Withnell (‪@neilwithnell‪ ) who is a Senior Lecturer/Associate Dean Academic Enhancement at the University of Salford.

To participate in the chat you need a Twitter account; if you do not already have one you can create an account at www.twitter.com. Once you have an account contributing is straightforward, You can follow the discussion by searching links to #ebnjc or contribute by creating and sending a tweet to @EBNursingBMJ and add #ebnjc (the EBN chat hash tag) at the end of your tweet.

I remember starting my mental health nurse training over 30 years ago and the teacher explaining that nurses don’t label individuals, like doctors do. The teacher continued to explain to the six of us (yes that was the size of our group) that a label did not help as no two people were the same and symptoms varied across individuals, so we were trained to treat and respond to symptoms. I immediately knew I had made the right career choice as I wanted to work with individuals with mental health difficulties, and to challenge the stigma that this brings.

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Consulting with young people’s about their health needs

25 Jan, 16 | by josmith

Dr Linda Milnes,

Associate Professor in Children and Young People’s Nursing,IMG_8979

School of Healthcare, University of Leeds

http://medhealth.leeds.ac.uk/profile/1100/1403/linda_milnes

Twitter @LindaMilnes

As the 2015 update of Key Data for Adolescence (Association for Young People’s Health) was published, last September, once again we are alerted to the fact that one fifth of the UK’s population are 10-24 years old, which is 11.7 million young people.   One in seven of this population have a diagnosis of a long-term condition or disability. Many of these young people will be cared for by specialist services in paediatric centres but will also access primary care services. An example of this is young people with asthma, reported as 800,000 in the UK.  Young people talk of experiencing daily symptoms, restrictions on activities, having good days and bad days and feeling different to their peers (Callery et al., 2003). Health care for this group should be patient-centred and focus on skilling young people to self-care effectively as they move towards adulthood a transition we know can bring many challenges for them.

Consultations between health professionals and young people are an opportunity to develop and build therapeutic relationships, gain young people’s perspectives on their condition and understand their priorities for effective self-care. However, research tells us that young people’s participation in consultations can be limited (Lyte et al., 2007; Cahill and Papageorgiou, 2007). Using asthma as an exemplar, young people report a lack of confidence in asking questions (Dixon-Woods et al., 2002), feeling intimidated (Milnes et al., 2014) and uncomfortable about attending asthma appointments alone (Edgecombe et al., 2010).

It is here that my research interests lie, supporting the development of young people’s communication skills and promoting their participation in consultations. Participating in consultations, communicating health needs and concerns, taking part in complex decisions about disease management all require high level communication and interpersonal skills. Doctors and nurses receive high level training in communicating with young people and can learn from experiences, but there is still a problem. In response to a call by young people for health professionals to improve their communication skills further training is now available (http://www.mefirst.org.uk/). I would argue that this is an excellent way forward but we know that communicating with health professionals requires confidence and practice in a, sometimes, paternalistic environment so why not train patients to participate? Alongside young people and experts in the field of respiratory care and health psychology, I developed an intervention to promote young people’s participation in primary care consultations. more…

Student Nursing Finance

19 Jan, 16 | by Gary Mitchell, Associate Editor

On Wednesday 20th February, our #ebnjc tweet-chat focuses on the issue of student nursing finance. In advance of our chat, we are delighted to share two blogs from our two special guest hosts, Grant Byrne & Serena Ruffoni. 

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Click Here to Read Grant and Serena’s Guest Blogs

Could embracing the ‘slow movement’ help manage change?

11 Jan, 16 | by josmith

Dr Joanna Smith,

Lecturer Children’s Nursing, University of Leeds and Associate Editor Evidence Based Nursing

@josmith175             IMG_0206

Developed counties are facing an ageing population, unprecedented advancements in medical technology, changing disease profiles and the influence of lifestyle choices on health and well-being, and increased patient expectations, which are challenging the future delivery of health and social care. These challenges are compounded by a global economic downturn Healthcare delivery continues to be a major issue in the global economy. Nowhere is this felt more strongly then is Asia where populations continue to rise and current medical delivery systems have been unable to keep pace. With pressure in more stable markets like North America and Europe to reduce healthcare costs, companies such as GE, Siemens, Phillips Medical and others are looking at third world countries, especially in Asia for growth., whether private or publicly funded, where finite resources are impacting on available funds to support health and social care. The challenges for governments in developed countries include responding to changing health care needs, and meeting population and health professionals’ expectations while delivering cost effective services. Within the English National Health Service a radical programme of service redesign has been driven by the twin imperatives of quality and efficiency with an emphasis on prevention, quality improvement, innovation and best value for money. Safe, effective and sustainable care must be underpinned by health professionals having the skills and competencies necessary to deliver high quality care, working together to meet patients’ needs and expectations. Surely what is needed is care based on compassion that meet concerns of patients, or in the case of children’s nurses, children, young people and families. more…

Placements for Pre-registration Children’s Nursing Students in Primary Care Settings

3 Jan, 16 | by atwycross

This week’s EBN Twitter Chat on Wednesday 6th January between 8-9 pm (UK time) will focus on placements for pre-registration children’s nursing students in primary care settings. The Twitter Chat will be hosted by Jessie McCulloch (@jem8239) who is a Darzi Fellow based at London South Bank University and a children’s nurse and health visitor. This Blog provides some context for the Chat.

Participating in the Twitter chat requires a Twitter account. If you do not already have one you can create an account at www.twitter.com. Once you have an account contributing is straightforward. You can follow the discussion by searching links to #ebnjc (all Tweets), or contribute by creating and sending a tweet (tweets are text messages limited to 140 characters) to @EBNursingBMJ and add #ebnjc (the EBN chat hash tag) at the end of your tweet, this allows everyone taking part to view your tweets.

Practice placements are an essential component of pre-registration nursing courses, comprising 50% of students’ learning. Placements enable the transition to becoming a nurse, application of theory to practice and ensuring that nurses have the skills required to become a registered professional ( Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) 2010). The NMC state that one of the aims of their 2010 standards was ‘to enable nurses to give and support high quality care in rapidly changing environments’ (NMC 2010 p.4).

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Happy New Year from Evidence Based Nursing

1 Jan, 16 | by atwycross

As we start a new year it is timely to reflect on our successes in 2015. I have now been editor of Evidence Based Nursing (EBN) for over five years and during that time we have made a number of changes all of which are designed to help nurses and midwives implement evidence into practice more easily. So what are the highlights of 2015?

Lobbying

I am particularly excited about the lobbying EBN has managed to do on two key issues this year. Our Twitter Chat on 20th May about the implications of the Shape of Caring Review for children’s nursing and the subsequent EBN Opinion piece were used as evidence of the views of the profession when lobbying key decision makers. A summary of this Twitter Chat can be seen at: http://bit.ly/1R9oljW.

In the run up to the Assisted Dying Bill being read in the House of Commons in September we published a guest editorial by Dr Robert Twycross reflecting on some of the reasons legalising assisted dying would not be a good thing – see: http://bit.ly/1OFkF48. An accompanying podcast was also recorded – see: http://bit.ly/1LVMxQZ. In the week the Bill was read we published two Blogs highlighting some of the unintended consequences of legalising assisted dying:

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Dual Legacies of a Health Career and a Baton to Match

31 Dec, 15 | by Gary Mitchell, Associate Editor

In our #ebnjc blog series we have already celebrated children’s nursing; with blogs from Jayne Pentin, Kirsten Huby & Marcus Wootton, learning disability nursing; with blogs from Professor Ruth Northway, Jonathan Beebee & Amy Wixey, midwifery; with blogs from Louise Silverton CBE , Gina Novick & Lynsey Wilgaus, and adult nursing from Clare McVeigh, Professor Roger Watson, Professor Jan Dewing & Professor Elizabeth Robb

This week our #ebnjc December blog series concludes with four guest blogs on mental health nursing from Neil Withnell, Jessie McGreevy, Paul Canning & Peter Jones.

Today we welcome Peter Jones, a community mental nurse older adults.  In today’s blog Peter discusses the dual legacies of a health career.

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Click Here to Read Peter Jones’ Guest Blog

Mental Health of Nursing Students

30 Dec, 15 | by Gary Mitchell, Associate Editor

In our #ebnjc blog series we have already celebrated children’s nursing; with blogs from Jayne Pentin, Kirsten Huby & Marcus Wootton, learning disability nursing; with blogs from Professor Ruth Northway, Jonathan Beebee & Amy Wixey, midwifery; with blogs from Louise Silverton CBE , Gina Novick & Lynsey Wilgaus, and adult nursing from Clare McVeigh, Professor Roger Watson, Professor Jan Dewing & Professor Elizabeth Robb

This week our #ebnjc December blog series concludes with four guest blogs on mental health nursing from Neil Withnell, Jessie McGreevy, Paul Canning & Peter Jones.

Today we welcome Paul Canning, a lecturer in mental health nursing from Queen’s University Belfast, who discusses the possible unmet need in relation to the mental health of nursing students.

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Click Here to Read Paul Canning’s Guest Blog

Therapeutic Lying in Dementia Care

29 Dec, 15 | by Gary Mitchell, Associate Editor

In our #ebnjc blog series we have already celebrated children’s nursing; with blogs from Jayne Pentin, Kirsten Huby & Marcus Wootton, learning disability nursing; with blogs from Professor Ruth Northway, Jonathan Beebee & Amy Wixey, midwifery; with blogs from Louise Silverton CBE , Gina Novick & Lynsey Wilgaus, and adult nursing from Clare McVeigh, Professor Roger Watson, Professor Jan Dewing & Professor Elizabeth Robb

This week our #ebnjc December blog series concludes with four guest blogs on mental health nursing from Neil Withnell, Jessie McGreevy, Paul Canning & Peter Jones.

Today we welcome Jessie McGreevy, a dementia care specialist from Four Seasons Health Care.  Today Jessie, a finalist in the recent Nursing Times Awards, discusses the topical issue of therapeutic lying in dementia care.

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Click Here to Read Jessie McGreevy’s Guest Blog

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