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Australian boy is first to receive ‘artificial pancreas’ insulin pump

26 Jan, 15 | by Dr Dean Jenkins

Xavier Hames is a four year old boy with Type 1 diabetes and he has been fitted with an insulin pump that senses glucose levels and stops insulin – a step closer to an ‘artificial pancreas’. An artificial pancreas adds a glucose sensor to an insulin pump so that it can sense when to reduce or stop insulin to avoid hypoglycaemia. More sophisticated devices are being developed to improve the management of people requiring insulin.

Xavier’s story has been widely reported in the news:

“Diabetes breakthrough hailed as Australian boy given artificial pancreas” http://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/jan/21/australian-boy-given-artificial-pancreas-to-help-manage-type-1-diabetes

“World-first insulin pump for diabetic Perth boy Xavier Hames” http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-01-21/perth-boy-becomes-first-patient-fitted-with-artifical-pancreas/6032388

“Four-year-old Perth boy Xavier Hames has become the first patient in the world to receive an artificial pancreas as part of his routine diabetic care.” https://lockerdome.com/biosolutionscorp/7346894150058004

“A four-year-old Australian boy has been fitted with an artificial pancreas in what researchers said was a world first treatment for managing type 1 diabetes.” http://medicalobserverph.com/features-australian-boy-4-gets-world-first-artificial-pancreas/

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A word from the Editor In Chief – 10,000+ cases!

21 Jan, 15 | by Kristy Ebanks

What would you do if you woke up one morning and found that you could not stand, your legs simply won’t move.

This was exactly what the patient in this, our 10 000th case at BMJ Case Reports, discovered.

He presented to the Accident and Emergency Department with sudden bilateral lower limb paralysis and urinary retention. How would you manage his care? What would you do? He needs urgent attention. Is this trauma? Is there cord compression? Could this be Guillain – Barre? Could the paralysis become generalized? Will he stop breathing?

Put yourself in this patient’s position. How would you feel? Put yourself in the admitting doctor’s position. There is a need to act fast. Multiple disciplines will need to consult. The patient may need intensive care.

What is your working diagnosis? What do you need to exclude? How will you investigate?

Read on and tell us what you would do. How would discover what is wrong? How would you discuss this with the patient? What about his family?

Read on and find out whether the symptoms improve…. Sudden flaccid paralysis

The 10,000th BMJ Case Report

8 Jan, 15 | by Kristy Ebanks

Sudden flaccid paralysis

We have reached a milestone with this case but, can you answer the questions below?

F2.medium F1.medium

1. What may precipitate sudden onset paralysis?
2. What is seen in these two MRI figures?
3. What is the differential diagnosis?

If you don’t know the answers or want to know more read ’Sudden flaccid paralysis

The value of case reports

16 Dec, 14 | by Dr Dean Jenkins

Can case reports reveal the clinical value of radiology?

An odd question I know but a team of researchers from Germany asked very much that in a recently published paper. They concluded with the following answer:

“In case reports published in a prominent general medical journal radiological imaging is an important key player in the diagnostic process. In many cases, it is also the diagnostic tool which ultimately leads to determining the final diagnosis.” (1)

We are glad to see the prominent journal being our very own BMJ Case Reports. One aim – of pulling nearly 10,000 case reports into one place – has been to explore what additional value can be found in the collection. Data mining to look at the diagnostic value of radiology in challenging cases is one of them and the authors of this paper argue the case for that.

Please feel free to use BMJ Case Reports in your methods section. It is one of the most prestigious places to be in a paper. What data mining would you look for?

1 Wiesinger I, Scharf G, Platz N, et al. Evaluation of the contribution of radiological imaging to the final diagnosis in medical case reports. Eur Radiol 2014;:1–6. doi:10.1007/s00330-014-3537-7

Data visualisation

Data mining – another use for Case Reports?

Rare Case Of Severe Cholangiopathy Following Critical Illness

12 Nov, 14 | by Kristy Ebanks

Severe Cholangiopathy

We have some very interesting images for you but, can you answer the questions below?

Picture_3 image1edit

1. What is secondary sclerosing cholangitis?
2. What are the causes?
3. What are the potential complications in the short and the long term?

If you don’t know the answers or want to know more read ’Rare Case Of Severe Cholangiopathy Following Critical Illness

Mandibular swelling in a 5 year old child

28 Oct, 14 | by Kristy Ebanks

Mandibular myofibroma

We have some very interesting images for you but, can you answer the questions below?

Figure_4 (4) Figure_3 (3) Figure_1 (28)

1. Would you regard this primarily as a tumor?
2. How important would the histopathological exam be?
3. How would you manage it?

If you don’t know the answers or want to know more read ’Mandibular swelling in a 5 year old child- Mandibular myofibroma

The case of persistent sinus tract of facial area from dental origin

13 Oct, 14 | by Kristy Ebanks

Conservative management of persistent sinus tract

We have some very interesting images for you, have a look at the reviewer’s question below

CASE-3 CASE-2 CASE-1

1) How can we differentiate dental sinus tract from actinomycosis, pyogenic granuloma and malignancy?

If you don’t know the answers or want to know more read ’Conservative management of persistent sinus tract of facial area from dental origin: a report of three cases

The case of Ameboma

1 Oct, 14 | by Kristy Ebanks

Resurfacing of a vanishing illness

We have some very interesting images for you but, can you answer the questions below?

Figure_2-Colonoscopic_image__showing__ulcerations_with_yellowish_exudates_in_the_caecum Figure_1-CT_abdomen_showing_irregular_wall_thickening_of_the_caecum.

1. What is seen at colonoscopy?
2. What would you do if you encountered this for the first time at colonoscopy?
3. How would you make sure treatment was successful?

If you don’t know the answers or want to know more read ’Ameboma – Resurfacing of a vanishing illness!’

The case of palliative rehabilitation in the preservation of personhood at the end of life

1 Oct, 14 | by Kristy Ebanks

Preservation of personhood at the end of life

We have some very interesting images for you, have a look at the reviewers commentary below

fig_2 (3) Fig_1_The_Ring_Theory_of_Personhood

 

If you don’t know the answers or want to know more read ’The role of palliative rehabilitation in the preservation of personhood at the end of life

The case of Peripheral Ossifying Fibroma

17 Sep, 14 | by Kristy Ebanks

Peripheral Ossifying Fibroma

We have some very interesting images for you but, can you answer the questions below?

Figure_2-_Mesio-distal_and_Labio-lingual_extension_of_growth. Figure_1-_Exophytic_growth_in_the_mandibular_anterior_region_crossing_midline-_Labial_view.

1. What would be your clinical diagnosis?
2. How would you manage this patient primarily?
3. What histological findings would you expect?

If you don’t know the answers or want to know more read ’An unusual presentation of peripheral ossifying fibroma in old aged male

Most recent cases

Most recent cases