You don't need to be signed in to read BMJ Blogs, but you can register here to receive updates about other BMJ products and services via our site.

Breast pain in a patient on dialysis

24 Apr, 15 | by Kristy Ebanks

Calcific uremic arteriolopathy

We have some very interesting images for you but, can you answer the questions below?

buscher_4 buscher_3 buscher_2

1. What are the indications for dialysis?
2. What are the complications of dialysis?
3. What is calcific uremic arteriopathy?

If you don’t know the answers or want to know more read ’Breast pain in a patient on dialysis: a rare manifestation of calcific uremic arteriolopathy

Acquired savant syndrome

18 Apr, 15 | by Dr Dean Jenkins

Following a head injury whilst skiing an anonymous US lady now complains of remembering too much.

I could remember everywhere, like flicking through the pages of a book. Every place I had ever been, but specifically the buildings.

http://www.xojane.com/it-happened-to-me/acquired-savant-sydnrome

The lady goes on to say that her neurologist is considering writing up her case. I wonder if it will be submitted here?

The story has been reported in the press:

Woman claims ski accident has given her extraordinary mental powers (Independent)

‘A ski accident left me with advanced mental abilities': US woman tells her extraordinary story (Telegraph)

Picture of skiier

The Case of an ACL deficient knee

9 Apr, 15 | by Kristy Ebanks

Anterior Drawer test in an ACL deficient knee

We have some very interesting images for you but, can you answer the questions below?

ant_draw_1

1. What is the anterior draw test?
2. What do you see in these figures?
3. How else might the ACL be tested?

If you don’t know the answers, want to see a video or want to know more read ’Patient self-demonstration of the Anterior Drawer test in an ACL deficient knee

A rare but potentially fatal cause of diarrhoea and weight loss

2 Apr, 15 | by Kristy Ebanks

Enteropathy associated T-cell Lymphoma

We have some very interesting images for you but, can you answer the questions below?

Figure_2 (3) Figure_3 Figure_4 (1)

1. Diarrhoea can kill – under what circumstances may diarrhoea be fatal?
2. What types of enteropathy do you know?
3. How would you manage life-threatening diarrhoea due to a range of causes?
4. How would the different causes affect your management?

If you don’t know the answers or want to know more read ’A rare but potentially fatal cause of diarrhoea and weight loss: Enteropathy associated T-cell Lymphoma

Virchow-Robin spaces

19 Mar, 15 | by Kristy Ebanks

Hydrocephalus due to extreme dilatation of Virchow-Robin spaces

We have some very interesting images for you but, can you answer the questions below?

Image3 Image2 Image1

1. What are Virchow Robin spaces?
2. What do these images show?
3. How would you manage this hydrocephalus?

If you don’t know the answers or want to know more read ’Hydrocephalus due to extreme dilatation of Virchow-Robin spaces

Student Editor BMJ Case Reports

19 Feb, 15 | by Kristy Ebanks

BMJ Case Reports is looking for a medical student to work with us to enhance the journal for student authors and readers. BMJ Case Reports is an award winning online journal that publishes articles in all specialties – there are currently more than 10,000 published articles from 70 countries.

We want the Student Editor to identify the cases that are of most value for medical students and highlight these in our Blog – these will be the cases that have excellent learning points for students at all stages of their training and may be “textbook cases”.

You will also work on our newly created Global Health blog where where we feature case reports that discuss the social determinants of health and challenges (and potential solutions) to important Global Health problems. We are keen to develop this collection and to attract articles based on student electives.

We estimate that you will need to devote two to three hours per week to the role. You will have access to all the published articles and you may submit your own to be peer reviewed. You will be listed on our Editorial Board with a brief biography and we will support your attendance at events for medical students so you can promote BMJ Case Reports.

You can work remotely and you are welcome to visit us at BMA House and to attend any editorial meetings.

If you are interested in applying for the role please send your CV and ideas on how to improve the value of BMJ Case Reports for medical students to bmjcasereports@bmj.com before 31st March 2015. We welcome applications from students in any year.

A straight-forward stroke?

6 Feb, 15 | by Kristy Ebanks

A typical presentation of type A aortic dissection

We have some very interesting images for you but, can you answer the questions below?

fig_3 (6) fig_2 (6) fig_1 (8)

1. How common is non-carotid disease stroke?
2. How would you routinely investigate a patient who presents with stroke?
3. Which patients benefit from anti-coagulation to prevent a first stroke?

If you don’t know the answers or want to know more read ’A straight-forward stroke? May be not: atypical presentation of type A aortic dissection

Quiescent infective endocarditis in a patient with bronchopneumonia

30 Jan, 15 | by Kristy Ebanks

Splenic abscess

We have a very interesting image for you but, can you answer the questions below?

Nayak_July_2014_Figure_1

1. What would be your differential diagnosis in Figure 1?
2. What factors would determine whether you perform a splenectomy?
3. What is the latest evidence in terms of post-splenectomy sepsis?

If you don’t know the answers or want to know more read ’Splenic abscess as a potential initial manifestation of quiescent infective endocarditis in a patient with bronchopneumonia

Australian boy is first to receive ‘artificial pancreas’ insulin pump

26 Jan, 15 | by Dr Dean Jenkins

Xavier Hames is a four year old boy with Type 1 diabetes and he has been fitted with an insulin pump that senses glucose levels and stops insulin – a step closer to an ‘artificial pancreas’. An artificial pancreas adds a glucose sensor to an insulin pump so that it can sense when to reduce or stop insulin to avoid hypoglycaemia. More sophisticated devices are being developed to improve the management of people requiring insulin.

Xavier’s story has been widely reported in the news:

“Diabetes breakthrough hailed as Australian boy given artificial pancreas” http://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/jan/21/australian-boy-given-artificial-pancreas-to-help-manage-type-1-diabetes

“World-first insulin pump for diabetic Perth boy Xavier Hames” http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-01-21/perth-boy-becomes-first-patient-fitted-with-artifical-pancreas/6032388

“Four-year-old Perth boy Xavier Hames has become the first patient in the world to receive an artificial pancreas as part of his routine diabetic care.” https://lockerdome.com/biosolutionscorp/7346894150058004

“A four-year-old Australian boy has been fitted with an artificial pancreas in what researchers said was a world first treatment for managing type 1 diabetes.” http://medicalobserverph.com/features-australian-boy-4-gets-world-first-artificial-pancreas/

a27-620x329

A word from the Editor In Chief – 10,000+ cases!

21 Jan, 15 | by Kristy Ebanks

What would you do if you woke up one morning and found that you could not stand, your legs simply won’t move.

This was exactly what the patient in this, our 10 000th case at BMJ Case Reports, discovered.

He presented to the Accident and Emergency Department with sudden bilateral lower limb paralysis and urinary retention. How would you manage his care? What would you do? He needs urgent attention. Is this trauma? Is there cord compression? Could this be Guillain – Barre? Could the paralysis become generalized? Will he stop breathing?

Put yourself in this patient’s position. How would you feel? Put yourself in the admitting doctor’s position. There is a need to act fast. Multiple disciplines will need to consult. The patient may need intensive care.

What is your working diagnosis? What do you need to exclude? How will you investigate?

Read on and tell us what you would do. How would discover what is wrong? How would you discuss this with the patient? What about his family?

Read on and find out whether the symptoms improve…. Sudden flaccid paralysis

BMJ Case Reports: publishing, sharing and learning through experience

BMJ Case Reports

Publishing, sharing and learning through experience Visit site



Creative Comms logo

Most recent cases

Most recent cases