Salt, eating disorders and the impact of funding deadlines: most read articles in April

This month’s most read article was Krijthe et al.’s study on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and the risk of atrial fibrillation. Newly-published papers in the top ten most read include He et al.’s paper on salt reduction in England, and it’s relationship to blood pressure, stroke and ischaemic heart disease mortality and also Räisänen et al.’s paper on the role of gendered constructions of eating disorders in delayed help-seeking in men. Also proving popular for another month, is the cross sectional study on symptoms related to GSM radiation from mobile phone bases by Gómez-Perretta et el.

 

Rank Author(s) Title
1 Krijthe et al. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and the risk of atrial fibrillation: a population-based follow-up study
2 He et al. Salt reduction in England from 2003 to 2011: its relationship to blood pressure, stroke and ischaemic heart disease mortality
3 Herbert et al. The impact of funding deadlines on personal workloads, stress and family relationships: a qualitative study of Australian researchers
4 Gómez-Perretta et al. Subjective symptoms related to GSM radiation from mobile phone base stations: a cross-sectional study
5 Räisänen et al. The role of gendered constructions of eating disorders in delayed help-seeking in men: a qualitative interview study
6 Rao et al. Do healthier foods and diet patterns cost more than less healthy options? A systematic review and meta-analysis
7 Wager et al. Awareness and enforcement of guidelines for publishing industry-sponsored medical research among publication professionals: the Global Publication Survey
8 Jenkins et al. Effect of a 6-month vegan low-carbohydrate (‘Eco-Atkins’) diet on cardiovascular risk factors and body weight in hyperlipidaemic adults: a randomised controlled trial 
9 Larney et al. Opioid substitution therapy as a strategy to reduce deaths in prison: retrospective cohort study
10 Krusche et al. Mindfulness online: an evaluation of the feasibility of a web-based mindfulness course for stress, anxiety and depression

 

Most read figures are based on pdf downloads and full text views. Abstract views are excluded.

 

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