Proposal for the development of community end of Life Care: A guest post by Julian Abel

  Background Over the last 45 years the hospice movement has set the standard for caring for people who are approaching the end of life.  The levels of services have been developing steadily and the quality of care has been of the highest standard.  An unintentional consequence of the development of end of life services […]

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“One can die, but cannot fall ill”– A Survey on how costs may affect choice of therapy in Singapore

An article by Song Chiek Quah of the National Cancer Centre in Singapore   Introduction Continued advances in medical care in the recent years have given some hope to patients afflicted with diseases that, in the past, have poor prognoses. However it would seem that hope comes at a price, at least within the Singaporean context. This […]

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Des Spence asks, are we in denial?

Des Spence, in his BMJ ‘From the Frontline’ piece, asks the question, “Assisted dying: are doctors in denial?” It turns out that, rather than being for or against legalisation of physician assisted suicide, Des suggests a third, pragmatic position. He suggests that doctors routinely withhold treatment and shorten patients’ lives with the use of large […]

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Integrating quantitative and qualitative methods – and getting it published

Bill Noble, BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care, Editor-in-Chief Describing a study as ‘mixed method’ never felt very respectable or clever. For years we understood that finding the answer to questions about the value of parts of the health service required different kinds of data. The difficulty was knowing how best to put our findings together. […]

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