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Archive for November, 2009

Tension pneumatocoele in a child with an empyema

23 Nov, 09 | by Emilia Demetriou

In this concise and well written case report the authors raise an important question. Could vaccination be causing serotypic drift result in more severe infections as the general population become exposed to unseen serotypes of S.pneumonia

Tension pneumatocoele in a child with an empyema

Sudden onset proptosis secondary to cavernous sinus thrombosis from underlying mandibular dental infection

16 Nov, 09 | by Emilia Demetriou

This case describes a relatively unusual cause of cavernous sinus thrombosis which is one of those conditions that is ideal for educationally combining applied anatomy and pathology. The report is clear and educational and is an important reminder of a rare but devastating condition.

Sudden onset proptosis secondary to cavernous sinus thrombosis from underlying mandibular dental infection

Botulism case in Scotland

4 Nov, 09 | by Dr Dean Jenkins

There are reports of a case of an infant with botulism in Scotland.

“A 16-week-old baby boy is fighting for his life after being diagnosed with botulism.

Logan Douglas was admitted to hospital in Edinburgh where doctors spotted signs of the rare disease and ordered a test.

Health protection experts said there had not been a report of an infant with botulism in Scotland since 1983.”

UK Press Association 4th November

Rapid genome analysis for complex diagnoses

1 Nov, 09 | by Dr Dean Jenkins

A rapid genome analysis that took only 10 days helped make the correct diagnosis in a critically ill 5 month old Turkish boy.

http://opa.yale.edu/news/article.aspx?id=6988

“In a dramatic illustration of the power of emerging genetic technologies, Yale University researchers have reported making a clinical diagnosis for the first time using comprehensive DNA sequencing of all the protein-coding genes in the genome. The information changed the course of treatment of a baby boy suffering from symptoms of dehydration thousands of miles away in Turkey.

The new approach to DNA sequencing used by Yale researchers and described online Oct. 19 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences is called whole exome sequencing because it selectively analyzes the 1 percent of the genome that contains genes that code for proteins. This approach has the potential to lead to dramatic new insights into almost every human disease and, as cost of the technology decreases, will be commonly used in clinical settings, predicted Richard Lifton, senior author of the paper and Sterling Professor and chair in the Department of Genetics and professor of internal medicine.”

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