How Podcasts Make Me an Empathetic Physician

Our guest blog post this week comes from Johan Clarke, a third year medical student at Georgetown University School of Medicine planning on going into family medicine. He is a literature and medicine track scholar undergoing research on the relationship between abject horror and medicine. He received his BA in English literature from Georgetown University.  […]

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Crafting Resistance: Mental Health and Well-Being Among Refugee Groups

Today’s guest blog post comes from Dr. Jasmine Gideon, who is a senior lecturer in Development Studies at the Department of Geography at Birkbeck, University of London. Approaches to understanding trauma among refugee populations There has been a growing consensus within academic and policy debates on the limitations of bio-medical approaches to understanding trauma and mental health among […]

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Wuthering Wastes and the Withering State of Kerala, India

This week’s blog post comes from Kesavan Rajasekharan Nayar from the Global Institute of Public Health in Thiruvananthapuram and his co-workers. The blog succinctly presents the case of waste accumulation and its public health implications in Kerala, which is one of the most developed states of India. They point out that the public health implications […]

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Improving the Chances of Delivering Person-Centred Nursing Care

Continuing on from her previous blog post, ‘Nursing Humanities’, Catherine Kelsey begins her second paper by asking nurses to reconsider the use of the medical model of care in nursing and to seek alternative models as a means of ensuring that healthcare provision becomes truly person-centred and humanitarian. Coined by Laing (1971), the ‘medical model’ […]

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Nursing Humanities

In the first of two blog posts, Catherine Kelsey opens up a discourse about the challenges that surround the nursing profession in understanding not only what it means to experience illness, but also the importance of developing a truly humanistic approach to nursing care. As nurses we must not lose sight of the patient as a […]

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Where the Doctor-Patient Relationship is Heading: Literary Perspectives

The author of today’s guest blog post is Dr. Anna Magdalena Elsner, a Swiss National Science Foundation Marie Heim-Vögtlin Research Fellow working at the Center for Medical Humanities at the University of Zurich. Her current project is entitled ‘Palliative Pages’. Focusing on the history of modern palliative care in France as well as French end-of-life […]

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The Feverish State and Syncretic Holism: The Re-assertion of Oral Tradition in Medicine

  Oral tradition in medicine is the original form of medical treatment based on specificities and the context in which a patient is located. This tradition is fundamental to many formal and informal systems of medicine but it is highly visible in tribal medicine. The essential features of traditional healing systems have not been documented […]

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A Helical Tangle

This is a guest post by Rebecca Marshall. Rebecca has just graduated from UCL Medical School, having intercalated in Global Health. She is currently undertaking an MSc in Medical Anthropology, also at UCL. Her main interests include the intersections between medical anthropology, global health and bioethics, particularly in the insight Applied Medical Anthropology can offer […]

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