Primary Survey July 2018

Primary survey  Do EPs change their clinical behaviour in the hallway encounters or when a companion is present? A cross-sectional survey and the commentary by Jacky Hanson and Kirsten Walthall Privacy is a key element in the process of undertaking a consultation with a patient, as it allows due care and attention to paid to the patient’s […]

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Primary Survey June 2018. Emergency Medicine Journal

This month the primary survey is collated and written by Edward Carlton, Associate Editor, EMJ. Editor’s Choice: Controversies in Sepsis In this issue of the Emergency Medicine Journal (EMJ) we have two papers exploring tools to predict critical illness in sepsis. Two retrospective cohort studies, in ED patients with suspected sepsis/infection, evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of […]

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Primary Survey May 2018. Emergency Medicine Journal.

This month’s primary survey is brought to you by Caroline Leech, Associate Editor, EMJ. Does a brief intervention in the ED reduce illicit drug use? Health promotion is critical in Emergency Medicine (EM), and Brief interventions (BI) for alcohol use are well established. This prospective cohort study assessed the efficacy of a BI for drug […]

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Primary Survey April 2017

This month’s primary Survey is written by Mary Dawood. Don’t forget to visit the journal site to see more and keep in touch with us on Social Media. Also, don’t forget to listen and subscribe to our podcast to keep you up to date on the journal and topics in emergency medicine. Organ Donation in […]

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Primary Survey: November 2016.

Richard Body, Associate Editor The Manchester derby for paediatric early warning scores There is clearly a need for a validated physiological early warning score for specific use in the paediatric emergency department (PED). In this issue, Cotterill et al compare two paediatric early warning scores developed in Manchester: the Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital Early Warning […]

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Primary Survey August 2016. EMJ

Richard Body, Associate Editor Editor’s choice: Nurse versus computer for paediatric triage This month, Takahashi et al present a retrospective cohort study evaluating the impact of allowing nurses to change the triage priority assigned by the computerised Japanese Triage and Acuity algorithm (JTAS), which is based on the patient’s presenting complaint, historical factors and physiological […]

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Primary Survey July 2016

Mary Dawood, Associate Editor “People attend ED because they choose to” Emergency Department (ED) attendances over the past decade have been rising both in western countries as well as in the developing world. One school of thought attributes this to an increase in patients who would be better managed in primary care. Various initiatives have […]

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