What do Emergency Medicine and Donald J. Trump have in common?

*Caution: Emotionally-charged post, pinch of salt required… personal feelings only and not the editorial view of the EMJ/BMJ. On the morning of the 9th November 2016, I woke up to the earth-shattering news that Donald Trump had been elected President Elect of the United States. It’s a moment I’ll never forget. Rain pounded menacingly against […]

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Live and let die

Everyone dies. It’s a sad fact of life and a tough part of any healthcare professional’s day. Some deaths are unexpected, and hit us hard. Thankfully, there are those that we know are coming, and this gives us the opportunity to try to give that person a peaceful and comfortable end of their life, and for […]

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Nuances of Neurogenic Shock

Even when the mechanism is highly suggestive for significant spinal injury, the shocked major trauma patient is haemorrhaging until proven otherwise; cue blood products and damage control resuscitation. When there is no evidence of external haemorrhage in the primary survey, the EFAST is negative, and the trauma series CT shows no evidence of bleeding, a […]

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The weekend effect: Part 2 – a traumatic time!

If you haven’t already, listen to Ellen Weber and Chris Moulton talk about the background to the weekend effect. Click HERE. The UK Junior Doctors’ contract changes imposed by the government in order to shape their poorly defined ‘Seven Day NHS’ caused much debate and consternation surrounding the ‘weekend effect’, which seemed to be the […]

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How Junior Doctors Think: A Guide for Reflective Practice

In the UK, junior doctors will rotate through emergency medicine in their second year post-graduation (Foundation Year 2). They’re granted autonomy to make independent decisions and ‘own’ patients for the first time. Elsewhere in the hospital, a junior’s role is largely secretarial, and generally within the confines of ‘normal working hours’. In the ED, the hours are brutal, the […]

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